Notes on Movies for Which a Learning Guide has Not
Been Written -- Titles Starting with the Letter "B"


A,   C,   D,   E,   F,   G,   H,    I,    J,   KLM,  
N,   O,   P,   Q,   R,   S,   T,   U,   VW,   XY,   Z   

For the meanings of the initials in brackets at the end of many of the entries, click here.



Babe    A Talking and Playing for Growth Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Babe Ruth Story     (1948) No MPAA Rating; Director: Roy Del Ruth.    This film is not an accurate portrayal of the life story of Babe Ruth. For good biopics about baseball stars, see "Pride of the Yankees", which is about Lou Gehrig, and "The Jackie Robinson Story". [NR]

Baby Boom    (1987) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Charles Shyer.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Baby Face    (1933) MPAA Rating: TV-PG; Director: Alfred E. Green.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Baby M    (1988) No MPAA Rating; Director: James Steven Sadwith.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Bach's Fight For Freedom    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Back to Bataan    (1945) No MPAA Rating; Director: Edward Dmytryk.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Back to the Future    (1985) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Robert Zemeckis.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Bad and the Beautiful    (1952) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: Vincente Minnelli.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Badlands    (1973) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Terrence Malick.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Ballad Of A Soldier    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Ballerina    (2009) No MPAA Rating, but it would be a G; Director: Bertrand Normand.     This documentary describes the post-Soviet process for becoming a ballerina with St. Petersburg's Kirov Ballet and provides tantalizing glimpses of the Kirov's current (as of 2009) ballerinas. It could be said that this film is an advertising piece for the Kirov and its current crop of ballerinas, but it is still a must see, along with "Ballet Russes" for dancers and anyone who loves ballet. TWM has not prepared a guide for this film because: (a) TWM already has several guides to movies about ballet, (b) in the United States, unfortunately, there is a limited audience for movies about ballet, and (3) there is less need for a Learning Guide for a documentary than if the movie were a work of fiction. (JAF & DEF, 2009) [LI]

Ballet Russes    (2005) No MPAA Rating, but it would be a G; Directors: Daniel Geller and Dayna Goldfine.     This excellent documentary provides a history of the Ballet Russes with interviews with many of the dancers who made the Ballet Russes famous. This film is a must see, along with "Ballerina" for dancers and anyone who loves ballet. TWM has not prepared a guide for this film because: (a) TWM already has several guides to movies about ballet, (b) in the United States, unfortunately, there is only a limited audience for movies about ballet, and (3) there is less need for a Learning Guide for a documentary than if the movie were a work of fiction. (JAF & DEF, 2006) [LI]

Ball of Fire    (1941) No MPAA Rating; Director: Howard Hawks.    This film is ranked #92 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006).

Bananas    (1971) MPAA Rating: Rated PG-13 for comic sexuality including some pin-up nudity, some drug use and crude language; Director: Woody Allen.    This film is ranked #69 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006). See the section on this movie in Reel Justice.

The Band Wagon    (1953) No MPAA Rating; Director: Vincente Minnelli.    This film is ranked #17 on the American Film Institute's List of the Greatest Movie Musicals of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Bang, Bang You're Dead    (2002) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Guy Ferland.    "[This] is a film about a play and its effect on a high school. The play, written by William Mastreone, is available as a free download via the internet. I have directed the play as a competition piece, and the film creates a lot of positive discussion on the play's meaning and its possible effects on a community. It also gets a good discussion started about civics and moral education." Elaine Little, Teacher, Calhoun, GA. Suggested grades: 9-12.

The Bank Dick    (1940) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: Edward F. Cline.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Barabbas    (1962) No MPAA Rating; Director: Richard Fleischer.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Baraka    (1992) No MPAA Rating; Director: Ron Fricke.    This is a film without words, showing beautiful scenes of human life followed by scenes of human destruction. We have the sense that a great lesson could be made from this film but alas, we weren't able to do it. If anyone has any ideas, we'd be glad to hear them. See the entry for this film in Reading in the Reel World: Teaching Documentaries and Other Nonfiction Texts by John Golden, National Council of Teachers of English, 2006.[LI} (JAF, 2012)

The Barbarian Invasions    (2003) MPAA Rating: R for language, sexual dialogue and drug content; Director: Denys Arcand.     This film is a comical and bittersweet look at life's meaning, coming to terms with a terminal illness, charting a good death, and the central significance of the love of family and friends. At the outset of the movie, the patient, a womanizing university professor, is estranged from his son, who is a hot shot in the financial markets and a straight arrow. By the end, the son has grown into a loving caretaker, and the father is able to fully express his love and gratitude. This is a profoundly moving film by the director of the superb allegory, "Jesus of Montreal". It is aimed at a mature audience and not appropriate for most children below the age of 18. [LI] (JAF & DEF, 2008)

Barbary Coast    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Barber of Seville    (1984) No MPAA Rating; Glyndebourne Festival Opera.    Not engaging for children. Try "Carmen" and "La Traviata", which we find to be accessible operas. [NA]

The Barber of Siberia    (1998) No MPAA Rating; Director: Nikita Mikhalkov.    Recommended by Asia, a teacher from Russia. [LI]

Barfly    (1987) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Barbet Schroeder.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Barry Lyndon    (1975) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Stanley Kubrick.     The film starts with Lyndon's cousin inducing him to put his hand on a girl's breast and other assorted inanities. This is not the type of conduct to be teaching young adolescents. See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies. [NR] (JAF)

Baseball     A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Basquiat    (1996) MPAA Rating: R for drug use and strong language; Director: Julian Schnabel.     This is a fascinating film about the New York art scene. Not appropriate for children under 18. [NR] (JAF & DEF, 2008)

Bat 21    (1988) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Peter Markle.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Batman Begins   (2005) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for intense action violence, disturbing images and some thematic elements; Director: Christopher Nolan.    The "moral lessons" which this film touts are shallow and undercut by the plot. It's a fun film for entertainment. [ITO] (JAF)

Battle Cry    (1955) No MPAA Rating; Director: Raoul Walsh.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Battle of Britain    (1969) MPAA Rating: G; Director: Guy Hamilton.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Battle of the Bulge    (1965) No MPAA Rating; Director: Ken Annakin.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

The Battle of San Pietro    (1945) MPAA Rating: Unrated; Director: John Huston.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Battleground    (1949) No MPAA Rating; Director: William Wellman.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Beaches    (1988) MPAA Rating: PG-13; Director: Garry Marshall.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

The Beast    (1988) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Kevin Reynolds.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Beau Geste    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Beauty and the Beast    (1991) MPAA Rating: G; Directors: Gary Trousdale, Kirk Wise.    This film is ranked #22 on the American Film Institute's List of the Greatest Movie Musicals of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Beautiful Country    (2004) MPAA Rating: Rated R for some language and a crude sexual reference. Director: Hans Petter Moland.     This is the story of the child of an American soldier and a Vietnamese mother who comes to the United States. It is excellent and has good themes. The movie provides insight into the lives of boat people who illegally immigrate to the U.S. [LI] (JAF & DEF)

Beautiful Dreamers    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

A Beautiful Mind    (2001) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for intense thematic material, sexual content and a scene of violence; Director: Ron Howard.    Suggested by several TWM Users. See the section on this movie in Reel v. Real: How Hollywood Turns Fact Into Fiction. [LI]

Becket    (1964) No MPAA Rating; Director: Peter Glenville.     Historically inaccurate. The film is based on the proposition that Becket was a Saxon who realized that his people would have to reconcile themselves to Norman Rule. The real Becket was a Norman himself. In the film, Becket carouses with the King. The real live Becket was abstemious and chaste. The film contains some interesting historical lessons about the melding of the Normans and the indigenous Saxons to create the English people, but the historical errors are simply too large for us to recommend this film. See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies. For another film about the melding of the Normans and the Anglo-Saxons, see "The Adventures of Robin Hood". [NR]

Becoming Jane    (2007) MPAA Rating: PG for brief nudity and mild language; Director: Julian Jarrold.    This film is a fantasy about what a romance might have been like if there had been one between Jane Austen and a Mr. Tom Lefroy. In fact, the only mention of Mr. Lefroy is in a few letters that Jane wrote to her sister over a period of seven days in 1796. There is nothing in these letters about an actual romance. In the movie, the details are derived from episodes similar to events portrayed in Pride and Prejudice. "'Becoming Jane' is a movie every Janeite will want to see, although many will not approve of it. The Jane Austen in the film owes a great deal more to modern romantic fancies than to what we know about the real Jane Austen . . ." Roger Ebert's Review in the Chicago Sun Times. An interesting exercise for classes reading Pride and Prejudice would be to have students watch the film as homework and identify the scenes that come from the book. The movie is beautifully shot, well acted, but a bit long. For college classes in Austen, this movie will be a great treat at the end of the course. [ITO] (JAF & DEF, 2008)

Beethoven Lives Upstairs    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Beetlejuice    (1988) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Tim Burton.    This film is ranked #88 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006).

Behind The Sun    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Being There    (1979) MPAA Rating: PG-13; Director: Hal Ashby.    Peter Sellers stars as a mentally handicapped man taken to be profound by those around him. Many people love this movie but for others the film moves too slowly. It is ranked #26 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006). Children will have a hard time tolerating it. [NR] (JAF 2013)

Belle et la Bete (Beauty and the Beast)    (1946) No MPAA Rating; Director: Jean Cocteau.    Suggested by a TWM User.

Ben and Me    A Talking and Playing for Growth Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Bend It Like Beckham    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Bend of the River    (1952) No MPAA Rating; Director: Anthony Mann.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ    (1925) No MPAA Rating; Director: Fred Niblo.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Ben-Hur    (1959) MPAA Rating: G; Director: William Wyler.    This film is ranked #72 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Benny and Joon    (1993) MPAA Rating: PG for theme, a scene of mild sensuality and one use of harsh language; Director: Jeremiah S. Chechik.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Berlin Tunnel 21    (1981) No MPAA Rating; Director: Richard Michaels.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

The Best Years Of Our Lives    (1946) No MPAA Rating; Director: William Wyler.    This film is ranked #37 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. This is an excellent film about the adjustment process when soldiers come home from a war. "It concerns three soldiers returning to the same small town after the end of the war. It's a well-made movie. The character of Homer Parish will provide a discussion of handicaps faced by returning soldiers. An interesting note to this is that the young man playing Homer, Harold Russell, was actually in the military and lost his hand in an accident while on active duty" John Goodloe, Michigan City, IN.[LI]

Beverly Hills Cop    (1984) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Martin Brest.    This film is ranked #63 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006).

Beyond A Reasonable Doubt    (1956) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Fritz Lang.    See the section on this movie in Reel Justice.

Beyond Rangoon    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Beyond the Gates of Splendor    (2005) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for some violent content and thematic elements; Director: Jim Hanon.     This is a documentary which begins with the story of five young missionaries to South America in the mid-1950s. They were killed by a savage tribe of indigenous people when they unnecessarily placed themselves in a situation of danger. The balance of the movie describes the efforts of the families of the missionaries to reconcile with the members of the tribe. Families that encourage their children to become missionaries should consider this film as a lesson in what not to do in situations of potential danger. [ITO]

Bhaji on the Beach    (1993) MPAA Rating: R for language and a scene of domestic abuse; Director: Gurinder Chadha.     This is a movie about South Asian immigrants to the U.K. and domestic violence. It is part of an emerging genre of films about the situation of South Asians who have immigrated to the West. We haven't seen this film. (For an example of this genre on TeachWithMovies.com, see "Bend It Like Beckham".)

Big    (1988) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Penny Marshall.    This film is ranked #42 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006). See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Big Business    (1929) No MPAA Rating; Directors: James W. Horne and Leo McCarey.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Big Chill    (1983) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Lawrence Kasdan.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

The Big Country    (1958) No MPAA Rating; Director: William Wyler.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

The Big Lift    (1950) No MPAA Rating; Director: George Seaton.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

The Big Parade    (1925) No MPAA Rating; Director: King Vidor.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. See the section on this movie in Past Imperfect.

The Big Red One    (1980) MPAA Rating: Rated R for war violence and some language; Director: Andrew Marton.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

The Big Sleep    (1946) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: Howard Hawks.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Big Trail    (1930) MPAA Rating: Passed; Director: Raoul Walsh.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure    (1989) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Stephen Herek.    This is a mindless movie about the future and two boys who are given a time machine to finish a school project necessary for them to pass their history class. They go back in time and collect famous people including Napoleon, Billy the Kid, Abraham Lincoln, Socrates, etc. Other than the list of names there is nothing beneficial about this film. Nothing harmful either. [ITO] (JAF)

Billy Budd    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Billy Elliot    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Birdy    (1984) MPAA Rating: R: Director: Alan Parker.    This is a psychological study in friendship and PTSD in soldiers who served in Vietnam. [LI] (JAF 2013)

Birth of a Nation    (1915) No MPAA Rating; Director: D. W. Griffith.    While this movie explored new frontiers in film syntax, it is racist propaganda that distorts the historical record. It was a major factor in popularizing the Lost Cause myth. The movie also assumes that President Lincoln was a friend of the South and completely ignores his determination to crush the Southern aristocracy which had caused the Civil War and also to abolish slavery. See e.g., Lincoln (which is historically accurate on Lincon's determination to outlaw slavery and in most other important respects), Lincoln in Hollywood, from Griffith to Spielberg by Sean Wilentz in The New Republic, 12/21/12 and Lincoln at the Movies by Louis P. Masur, Chronicle of Higher Education 11/26/12. See also the sections on this film in Reel v. Real: How Hollywood Turns Fact Into Fiction, History Goes to the Movies, and in Past Imperfect. Some teachers have told us that they use the movie to demonstrate the racist nature of U.S. society in the early 20th century. The film is ranked #44 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006). It is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. For a musical view of the birth of the U.S., see "1776". [NR without an intense amount of scaffolding and parental permission.]

The Birth of the Constitution    A Learning Guide has been prepared for thie Peanuts cartoon appropriate for 5th and 6th graders.

The Bishop's Wife    (1947) No MPAA Rating; Director: Henry Koster.    An angel falls in love with the Bishop's wife. Charming film to watch with your children for entertainment. Not much curriculum related content. Some superficial morality is shown but not enough to justify the use of this movie as a teaching tool. [ITO]

Bizet's Dream    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Blackfish    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

The Black Pirate    (1926) No MPAA Rating; Director: Albert Parker.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Black Robe    (1991) MPAA Rating: R for areas of strong violence and sensuality; Director: Bruce Beresford.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies and in Past Imperfect.

The Black Stallion    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Blackboard Jungle    (1955) No MPAA Rating; Director: Richard Brooks.    Suggested by a TWM User. See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies. [LI]

Blacksmith Scene    (1893) No MPAA Rating; Director: William K.L. Dickson.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Blade Runner    (1982) MPAA Rating: R for violence and brief nudity (definitive cut), Rated R for violence (1991 version); Director: Ridley Scott.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House    (1948) No MPAA Rating; Director: H.C. Potter.    No real educational value. "The Money Pit" is better. [ITO]

Blazing Saddles    (1974) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Mel Brooks    This film is ranked #6 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Bliss    (1997) MPAA Rating: R for graphic sex scenes with strong sex-related dialogue, and for language; Director: Lance Young.    This film is for adults. It is an in-depth study of co-dependence and the effects of childhood sexual abuse. The solutions of the sex therapist character are extreme but the film overall can be extremely beneficial to people dealing with those issues. We are informed that it has been recommended by psychologists to their patients as part of their treatment. Like medication, when viewed for the purpose of helping people deal with co-dependence or childhood sexual abuse, it should be seen in conjunction with therapy and after consultation with the therapist. [NR] (JAF)

The Blood of Jesus    (1941) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: Spencer Williams.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Blow    (2001) MPAA Rating: Rated R for pervasive drug content and language, some violence and sexuality; Director: Ted Demme.    See the section on this movie in Reel v. Real: How Hollywood Turns Fact Into Fiction. [NR]

The Blue Bird    (1918) No MPAA Rating; Director: Maurice Tourneur.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Blue Crush    (2002) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for elements of violence and peril. Director: John Stockwell.     This is a movie about girl surfers and male football players in Hawaii. The only really good parts are the gorgeous surfing shots. The rest ranges from the predictable to the disgusting, including views of vomit and the contents of toilet bowls. [NR] (JAF, 2006)

The Blue Kite    (1993) No MPAA Rating; Director: Zhuangzhuang Tian.     This is an excellent film about life in China from 1945 through the 1960's. We were so impressed that we almost completed a Learning Guide for it. But the film is simply too long and slow moving for adolescents. [NA] (JAF & DEF)

The Blue Max    (1966) MPAA Rating: R; Director: John Guillermin.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Blue Velvet    (1986) MPAA Rating: R; Director: David Lynch.    A teacher who is an expert at using film in the classroom has developed a way to use scenes from this movie for certain activities. See Reading in the Dark, by John Golden, 2001, National Council of Teachers of English. We have not reviewed this movie.

The Boat (Das Boot)    (1981) MPAA Rating: Rated R for some war violence and brief language; Director: Wolfgang Petersen.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

The Bolero    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Bonnie and Clyde    (1967) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Arthur Penn.     This film is ranked #27 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. It is one of the watershed films in Hollywood's increasing exploitation of violence in the latter half of the 20th century. We do not intend to prepare a Learning Guide for this movie because of its showing of gratuitous violence and glamorization of a life of crime. However, it is faithful to the main events of the story of Barrow and Parker. It portrays, with reasonable accuracy, Depression era hard times and the alienation of the poor, particularly from law enforcement. The film explores the lives and psychology of criminals with some insight. See the sections on this movie in: Reel v. Real: How Hollywood Turns Fact Into Fiction; History by Hollywood: The Use and Abuse of the American Past; Past Imperfect; and History Goes to the Movies. [PD] (JAF & DEF)

The Book Thief    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Boomerang!    (1947) No MPAA Rating; Director: Elia Kazan.    See the section on this movie in Reel Justice.

The Boost    (1988) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Harold Becker.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan    (2006) MPAA Rating: R for pervasive strong crude and sexual content including graphic nudity, and language; Director: Larry Charles.    The humor in this movie is based on reducing everyone to their lowest level and laughing at them. This is not really a movie for an adult to suggest to children. Towards the end, Borat and his obese director fight naked and chase each other through a hotel and an audience gathered for a speech. [NR] (JAF, 2007)

Born Free    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Born Into Brothels    (2004) MPAA Rating: R for some sequences of strong language; Directors: Zana Briski and Ross Kauffman.    See the entry for this film in Reading in the Reel World: Teaching Documentaries and Other Nonfiction Texts by John Golden, National Council of Teachers of English, 2006. (JAF & DEF)

Born Yesterday    (1950) No MPAA Rating; Director: George Cukor.    This film is ranked #24 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006).

La Boum    (1980) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Claude Pinoteau.     This comedy contains adult themes, shows children sneaking around to avoid their parents' rules, contains adultery, and when the characters are upset they resort to mild violence. The film contains little curriculum related content and few good messages. [NR] (JAF)

The Bounty    (1984) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Roger Donaldson.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Bowfinger    (1999) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for sex related material and language; Director: Frank Oz.     Funny and entertaining but we could not think of a way to make this into a teaching tool. [ITO] (JAF & DEF)

Bowling for Columbine    (2002) MPAA Rating: R for some violent images and language; Director: Michael Moore    See the entry for this film in Reading in the Reel World: Teaching Documentaries and Other Nonfiction Texts by John Golden, National Council of Teachers of English, 2006. (JAF & DEF)

The Boy Who Could Fly    (1986) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Nick Castle.    This film is based upon an improbable premise, that a boy can levitate off the ground and fly as high as the clouds, taking his best girl with him, a la Peter Pan. On the way there is real tragedy, a father committing suicide when diagnosed with cancer and a child left an orphan when his parents die in a plane crash. There is also a scene in which two teenage girls get drunk on the family's store of alcohol. There was almost something here but it missed. [ITO]

The Boy With Green Hair    (1948) No MPAA Rating; Director: Joseph Losey.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Boys Don't Cry    (1999) MPAA Rating: Rated R for violence including an intense brutal rape scene, sexuality, language and drug use; Director: Kimberly Peirce.    See the section on this movie in Reel v. Real: How Hollywood Turns Fact Into Fiction.

The Boys From Brazil    (1978) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Franklin J. Schaffner.    Suspenseful plot but hokey and historically inaccurate. The movie trivializes the evils of the Nazis and the horror of the Holocaust. For films about the European experience in WW II, see the Subject Matter Index, World History and Other Cultures, section on WW II, "The War in Europe." [NR] (JAF)

The Boys in the Band    (1970) MPAA Rating: R; Director: William Friedkin.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Boycott    (2001) MPAA Rating: PG for thematic material and some language; Director: Clark Johnson.    "It does a wonderful job telling the story and struggle of the early Civil Rights movement and Martin Luther King, Jr.'s rise to leadership and struggle with the role. There are no possible problems that I see and the benefit is amazing, my students were moved because they felt it was the first time they saw MLK as a man, not an icon." Lisa LeDonne-Stan, Teacher, Santa Rosa, CA. Suggested grades: 8-12. [LI]

Boystown    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Boyz n the Hood    (1991) MPAA Rating: R for language, violence and sensuality; Director: John Singleton.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Braveheart    (1995) MPAA Rating: R for brutal medieval warfare; Director: Mel Gibson.    Suggested by several people. TWM doubts that this movie would be appropriate for a Learning Guide because of gratuitous violence and lack of historical content. See the sections on this movie in Reel v. Real: How Hollywood Turns Fact Into Fiction and in History Goes to the Movies. See also Roger Ebert's Review. If anyone can suggest how this movie would be worth 177 minutes of class time, please tell us.

Breaker Morant    (1979) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Bruce Beresford.    See the sections on this movie in History Goes to the Movies and Reel Justice.

Bread and Chocolate (Pane e cioccolata)    (1973) No MPAA Rating; Director: Franco Brusati     This comedy, which won many awards, pokes fun at the north/south divide in Europe. The film contains several profound scenes which apply to any country that makes use of immigrant labor. The lead actor Nino Manfredi, is excellent. It may work for senior level world literature or history classes. [LI] (DEF & sJAF 2010)

Breakfast at Tiffany's    (1961) No MPAA Rating; Director: Blake Edwards.    This is a sophisticated, lovely, and entertaining romance, but we can't find any real substance to it and we haven't discovered a way to make viewing this film into an educational experience. [ITO] (JAF)

Breakfast Club    (1985) MPAA Rating: R; Director: John Hughes.    Suggested by a TWM User. See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Breaking Away    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Breaking the Sound Barrier    (1952) No MPAA Rating; Director: David Lean.    This is a British film. "At the end of the movie a British pilot solves the mystery of 'the barrier' by reversing the controls at the critical moment during a power dive. The buffeting is tearing his ship to pieces ...." The Right Stuff by Tom Wolfe, pg. 61. In fact, it was the American test pilot Chuck Yeager who broke the sound barrier. Had he reversed the controls at any point in that flight, he would have crashed and died. The idea of reversing the controls when flying above the speed of sound is absurd. For a better film on this topic, see "The Right Stuff". [NR] (JAF)

Breakthrough    (1950) No MPAA Rating; Director: Lewis Seiler.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Brian's Song    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Bride of Frankenstein    (1935) No MPAA Rating; Director: James Whale.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. A teacher who is an expert at using film in the classroom has developed a way to use scenes from this movie for certain activities. See Reading in the Dark, by John Golden, 2001, National Council of Teachers of English. We have not reviewed this movie.

Bridge of San Luis Rey    (2004) MPAA Rating: PG for thematic elements, some disturbing images and some sensuality; Director: Mary McGuckian.     We found the film slow and that it evoked little interest. We don't think it will inspire children. [NA] (JAF & DEF)

Bridge on the River Kwai    (1957) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: David Lean.    This film is ranked #13 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. The entire concept of this film is based on a fallacy. Contrary to what we are told in the film, British officers did work on the Burma - Bangkok railroad. Resistance to the Japanese by the prisoners was by way of sabotage, not in refusing to work. See FORTRESS: The Story of the Siege & Fall of Singapore; by Kenneth Attiwill; Doubleday & Company, Inc.; 1960.For films about the Pacific Theater in WW II, see the Subject Matter Index, World History and Other Cultures, section on WW II, "The War in the Pacific." See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies. [NR]

This film won seven Academy Awards in 1957. One of these was for the screenplay, which was written by two blacklisted writers, Carl Foreman and Michael Wilson. It was submitted under the name of Pierre Boulle, who was the author of the book from which the story was taken. Mr. Boulle did not write a word of the script. See Biographical sketch of Pierre Boulle from Pegasos - A literature related site in Finland. Bridge to Terabithia    (1985) No MPAA Rating; Director: Eric Till.    Suggested by a TWM User.

A Bridge Too Far    (1977) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Richard Attenborough.    Suggested by a TWM User.

The Bridges at Toko-Ri    (1954) No MPAA Rating; Director: Mark Robson.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Bridget Jones's Diary    (2001) MPAA Rating: R for language and some strong sexuality; Director: Sharon Maguire.    We could find no substance in this film to make it vehicle for instruction. [ITO] (JAF)

Bright Lights, Big City    (1988) MPAA Rating: R; Director: James Bridges.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Bringing Up Baby    (1938) No MPAA Rating; Director: Howard Hawks.    This film is ranked #97 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006). It is ranked #63 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Broadcast News    (1987) MPAA Rating: R; Director: James L. Brooks.    This film is ranked #64 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006). See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription. Journalism teachers might want to consider this but beware the R rating. TWM has not evaluated this film. (JAF & DEF)

Broken Arrow    (1950) No MPAA Rating; Director: Delmer Daves.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Broken Arrow    (1996) MPAA Rating: Rated R for strong action violence and language; Director: Lee Philips.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Broken Blossoms    (1919) No MPAA Rating; Director: D.W. Griffith.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

A Bronx Morning    (1931) No MPAA Rating; Director: Jay Leyda.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Brothers Grimm    (2005) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for violence, frightening sequences and brief suggestive material; Director: Terry Gilliam.     We couldn't find any teaching opportunities and thought that the film was rather mundane. [ITO] (JAF & DEF)

The Buccaneer    (1938) No MPAA Rating; Director: Cecil B. DeMille.    See the section on this movie in Past Imperfect.

The Buccaneer    (1958) No MPAA Rating; Director: Anthony Quinn.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies; and in Past Imperfect.

The Buddy Holly Story    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

The Buffalo Creek Flood: An Act of Man    (1975) No MPAA Rating; Director: Mimi Pickering.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Bugsy    (1991) MPAA Rating: R for violence, language and sensuality; Director: Barry Levinson.    See the sections on this movie in Reel v. Real: How Hollywood Turns Fact Into Fiction and History Goes to the Movies.

A Bug's Life    Both a Learning Guide and a Talking and Playing for Growth Guide have been prepared for this movie.

The Building Of The Transcontinental Railroad    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Bull Durham    (1988) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Ron Shelton.    This film is ranked #97 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006).

Bullitt    (1968) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Peter Yates.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Bullworth    (1998) MPAA Rating: R for sex, drug use, and profanity; Director: Warren Beatty.    This hilarious farce tells the story of a U.S. Senator, suffering from depression, who puts out a contract on his own life so that his family can collect on his life insurance. (It was given to him as a bribe by the insurance industry.) Freed from the necessity of raising money for re-election, he starts to tell the truth about many things, including the role of money in politics, why the problems of the black community are not addressed by public officials, violence in the media, etc. Suddenly, he begins having fun and his depression lifts. The film has lessons about the political process and the cost of selling out. Some adolescents love this movie. However, it's full of gross profanity and shows drug use. Instead, try "All the President's Men", almost a documentary in its fidelity to actual events, and which contains less profanity and no drug use. [PD] (JAF & DEF)

The Burning Bed    (1984) No MPAA Rating; Director: Robert Greenwald.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Burnt By The Sun    (1994) MPAA Rating: Rated R for some language and sexuality; Director: Nikita Mikhalkov.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies. This is a beautiful movie but TWM has not evaluated it for use as a teaching tool. (JAF & DEF)

Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid    (1969) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: George Roy Hill.    This film is ranked #50 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

BUtterfield 8    (1960) No MPAA Rating; Director: Daniel Mann    This is a character study of a woman suffering from one of the typical reactions to childhood sexual abuse. In her case it is very low self-esteem and promiscuity. The movie is a tragedy. Elizabeth Taylor won an Academy Award for Best Actress for the film. The opening scene is fantastic. The fashions, if not the story are somewhat dated. There is nothing in this film that would prevent it being shown to children 12+, other than the promiscuity which is the subject of the movie. [PD] (JAF & DEF, 2007)

By Dawn's Early Light    (1990) MPAA Rating: PG-13; Director: Jack Sholder.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.




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