Notes on Movies for Which a Learning Guide has Not
Been Written -- Titles Starting with the Letter "G"


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For the meanings of the initials in brackets at the end of many of the entries, click here.



Gabbeh    (1996) No MPAA Rating; Director: Mohsen Makhmalbaf.    This movie is beautiful visually and the story spare and interesting. We think the kids will have trouble with the quavering voice of the old man. But it's definitely worth a try. We are very interested to know if anyone has had experience with this movie with children. If it works out well, we will create a Learning Guide for it. [LI] (JAF)

Galileo: On The Shoulders Of Giants    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Gallipoli    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

The Gambler    (1974) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Karel Reisz.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Gandhi    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Garlic Is As Good As Ten Mothers    (1980) No MPAA Rating; Director: Les Blank.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Gathering    (1977) No MPAA Rating; Director: Randal Kleiser.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Gattaca    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

The General     (1927) No MPAA Rating; Directors: Clyde Bruckman and Buster Keaton.    This film is ranked #18 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. We find this film dated and uninteresting to children. [NA] (JAF)

General McBoing-Boing    (1951) No MPAA Rating; Director: Robert Cannon.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

A Gentleman's Agreement    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Germinal     (1937) MPAA Rating: R for intense depiction of suffering and class conflict; Director: Claude Berri.    This is an excellent presentation of Emile Zola's ground breaking novel of the plight of miners in France during the industrial revolution. There are several scenes of people bathing. The film shows the sexual mutilation of the corpse of a store owner who overcharged the striking miners and who died from a fall while fleeing from their wrath. It also contains a scene in which the hero takes his wife from the rear as "dessert" although both are fully clothed. [PD] (JAF & DEF)

Geronimo: An American Legend    (1993) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for frontier violence; Director: Walter Hill.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Gertie the Dinosaur    (1914) No MPAA Rating; Director: Winsor McCay.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Gettysburg    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Ghost    (1990) MPAA Rating: PG-13; Director: Jerry Zucker.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription. A teacher who is an expert at using film in the classroom has developed a way to use scenes from this movie for certain activities. See Reading in the Dark, by John Golden, 2001, National Council of Teachers of English.

Ghostbusters    (1984) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Ivan Reitman.    This film is ranked #28 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006).

Ghosts Of Mississippi    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Giant    (1956) MPAA Rating: G; Director: George Stevens.    This film is ranked #82 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Gideon's Trumpet    (1980) No MPAA Rating; Director: Robert E. Collins.    This film is about the case in which the U.S. Supreme Court established that people accused of felonies had the right to effective assistance of counsel. Suggested by a TWM User. [LI]

Gigi    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

The Girl in the Café    (2005) (TV) No MPAA Rating; Director: David Yates.    This is a Billy Nighy ("Love Actually") vehicle that doesn't work. It's painful to watch this inhibited bureaucrat attempt to make himself try to get a young girl into bed. It has an unrealistic plot line about a girl from nowhere who influences the industrialized nations to make good on their pledge of ending poverty in the Third World. There is some consciousness raising in the film but we don't think kids will ever get that far into it. [NA] (JAF & DEF)

Girl With a Pearl Earring    (2003) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for some sexual content; Director: Peter Webber.    This could be a teaching movie except it is slow moving. The cinematography is beautiful. It's the story of a young peasant maid who comes to the home of renowned Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer. She becomes his assistant and the model for one of his most famous works. The film features repressed sexuality and shows the home life of Vermeer. Teachers and parents interested in a film about this era might look at this film closely. [LI] (JAF & DEF)

Girlhood    (2003) No MPAA Rating; Director: Liz Garbus.    See the entry for this film in Reading in the Reel World: Teaching Documentaries and Other Nonfiction Texts by John Golden, National Council of Teachers of English, 2006. (JAF & DEF)

Gladiator    (2000) MPAA Rating: R for intense, graphic combat; Director: Ridley Scott.    We have doubts about the violence in this film. Suggested by a TWM User. See the section on this movie in Reel v. Real: How Hollywood Turns Fact Into Fiction.

The Glass Menagerie    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

The Gleaners and I    (2000) No MPAA Rating; Director: Agnès Varda.    See the entry for this film in Reading in the Reel World: Teaching Documentaries and Other Nonfiction Texts by John Golden, National Council of Teachers of English, 2006. (JAF & DEF)

The Glenn Miller Story    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Glimpse of the Garden    (1957) No MPAA Rating; Director: Unlisted.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Glory    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Glory Road    (2006) MPAA Rating: PG for racial issues including violence and epithets, and mild language; Director: James Gartner.    Suggested by a TWM User.

The Godfather    (1972) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Francis Ford Coppola.    This film is ranked #3 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Godfather Part II    (1974) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Francis Ford Coppola.    This film is ranked #32 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Gods Must Be Crazy    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

The Gods Must Be Crazy II    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Going My Way    (1944) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: Leo McCarey.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Gold Diggers of 1933    (1933) No MPAA Rating; Director: Mervyn LeRoy.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Gold Rush    (1925) No MPAA Rating; Director: Charles Chaplin.    This film is ranked #74 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006). It is ranked #25 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Gone With The Wind    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Goodbye Miss Fourth of July    (1988) No MPAA Rating; Director: George Miller.    A teacher wrote to us: "It is a great one for life in West Virginia, prejudice, and multi-culturalism, and we tied it in with the study of viruses and bacteria, disease, ethnic wars, etc." [LI]



Goodbye Solo     (2008) Rated R for language; Director: Ramin Bahrani    This is a beautiful and touching film about a Senegalese immigrant to North Carolina who works as a taxi and becomes convinced that one of his fares intends to commit suicide. We think that it's a little slow moving for young audiences. [NA] (JAF, 2013)

Good Bye Lenin!    (2003) MPAA Rating: R for brief language and sexuality; Director: Wolfgang Becker.     This is a comedy about post-unification Germany. Certainly, there are plenty of curriculum materials in this film about what life was like under communism and the changes that the end of communism brought to Eastern Europe. It probably would be funnier for audiences who actually lived through the Communist era and the changes at the end of the Cold War. We don't think it would inspire most children. [NA] (JAF)

The Good Earth     (1937) No MPAA Rating; Director: Sidney Franklin.    This film, important in its day, we think is now too stylized and dated to be a learning tool. For films about families in China see The Joy Luck Club or To Live. [NA] Note that there are teachers who disagree with us on this film. We received the following comments from a teacher who has used this film with good effect for at least fourteen years. Her comments are summarized below:
I was surprised to see that you do not recommend two movies that I DEFINITELY show to my Pacific Rim Nations class of sophomores - seniors: "The Good Earth" and "The Last Emperor." Based on a Pulitzer winning novel by Pearl Buck, "The Good Earth" shows the life of poor peasant farmers during the time of the last dynasty of China. I then show my students "The Last Emperor" which was the Academy award-winning Best Picture of 1987 to contrast life in the royal court with the toil of the peasants and to emphasize how the Empress Dowager, and then the last Emperor, Pu Yi, were indifferent to the needs of the people. I have edited out the offensive scenes in "The Last Emperor." Even after doing that, there are still many wonderful scenes remaining. (I use VHS so that I can edit the film.) I tell my high schoolers if they want to see the real thing, they'll have to rent it themselves. I don't think a single person has ever rented a copy for any movie that I have edited because much of the movies' stories remain. I have been showing these movies back to back for 14 years (or 28 semesters) and they are well received.
TeachWithMovies.com is not sure that editing the films is legal. However, violent scenes can be skipped without altering a copy of the movie. Many thanks to this teacher for her comments. We will reconsider. [LI] (JAF)

Goodfellas    (1990) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Martin Scorsese.    This film is ranked #94 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Good German    (2006) MPAA Rating: R for language, violence and some sexual content; Director: Steven Soderbergh.     This is an interesting film about the guilt of a person who, due to the crimes of others, must commit horrendous crimes just to survive. The ending is extremely unsatisfying from an ethical standpoint and teaches only how difficult ethical decisions can be. Ultimately, the protagonist's conduct, while understandable, was wrong. Loving a person is no reason to deny justice to the victims of his or her crimes. The movie shows sex as fornication and the violence borders on gratuitous. [NR] (JAF & DEF)

Good Morning Vietnam    (1987) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Barry Levinson.    This film is ranked #100 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006). This is a hilarious adult film but too vulgar and with too many raunchy sexual innuendos for use as a teaching tool. A teacher who is an expert at using film in the classroom has developed a way to use scenes from this movie for certain activities. See Reading in the Dark, by John Golden, 2001, National Council of Teachers of English. [PD] (JAF & DEF)

The Good Mother    (1988) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Michael Bortman.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Good Night, Mr. Tom    (1998) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Jack Gold.    Suggested by a TWM User.



The Good Thief    (2002) MPAA Rating: R for language, sexuality, drug content and some violence; Director: Neil Jordan     This is a fun caper movie with no teaching potential. It is deserving of its R Rating. NR (JAF & DEF, 2009)

Good Will Hunting    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Gore Vidal's Lincoln    (1988) No MPAA Rating; Director: Lamont Johnson.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Gorillas In The Mist    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Go Tell The Spartans    (1978) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Ted Post.    Suggested by a TWM User. See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Goya: Awakened In A Dream    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Goya's Ghosts    (2006) MPAA Rating: R for violence, disturbing images, some sexual content and nudity; Director: Milos Forman.    This is a richly made and beautifully filmed indictment of torture, as such, sadly, it has great relevance to the modern day. It is morally and empathetically accurate. A few of the historically correct points in the film are the facts that Goya became deaf and was under suspicion by the Inquisition; he did make those wonderful etchings ridiculing and criticizing the Inquisition and abuses by clergy; Spain was not hospitable to the ideals of the French Revolution, although Napoleon was able to install a relative as king for a time; the French were eventually kicked out of Spain by an invading British army which was supported by the Spanish people. Other facts are suspect. If an adult shows this movie to children we suggest fast forwarding through the torture scene. The only way that we could see this film being useful as a teaching movie would be to have students analyze if for historical accuracy. [ITO] (JAF & DEF, 2008)

Gracie's Choice    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

The Graduate    (1967) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Mike Nichols.    This film is ranked #7 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006). It is ranked #9 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Grand Canyon    (1991) MPAA Rating: R for language; Director: Lawrence Kasdan.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Grand Hotel    (1932) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: Edmund Goulding.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Grapes Of Wrath    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Grass: A Nation's Battle for Life    (1925) MPAA Rating: Approved; Directors: Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Grass Harp    (1995) MPAA Rating: PG for mild language and thematic elements; Director: Charles Matthau.     We don't think this will be interesting to most children nor can we find a way to turn it into a teaching tool. [NA] (JAF)

Grease    (1978) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Randal Kleiser.    This film is ranked #20 on the American Film Institute's List of the 25 Greatest Movie Musicals (2006). Many children will love this film. However, it contains gross profanity, the characters flaunt their disrespect for authority, three boys are shown mooning, and there is alcohol use by seniors in high school. But there is great dancing and good music. The movie is especially interesting to high school kids interested in musical theater. More importantly the romantic themes, the theme of the outsiders, and the issue of appearance vs. reality will entrance many teenagers because they are dealing with these issues as they grow up. One of our sons watched this film many times during the same period that he was devoted to "The Importance of Being Earnest" and "Twelfth Night", both of which deal with many of the same themes. It is clear that the people who gave this movie a PG rating didn't listen to the dialogue. Most people don't hear the depths of the profanity in this movie the first or second time they see it. We missed it too, for months. For a film about dancing and young people which we believe to be one of the best films of all time and which does not have the problems of "Grease", see "Strictly Ballroom", or for dance combined with a cold war thriller, see "White Nights". There are many other good dance movies listed at Dance section of the Subject Index. [PD] (JAF & DEF)

The Great Caruso    The film is out-dated. We did have a Learning Guide for this movie but took it off because we felt that the film was not usable.

The Great Dictator    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

The Great Escape    (1963) No MPAA Rating; Director: John Sturges.    Suggested by a TWM User. See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies. [LI]

Great Expectations    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

The Great Gatsby    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

The Great Inventors    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

The Great Santini    (1979) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Lewis John Carlino.    A teacher who uses this film with his classes wrote the following:
(The film) does not contain all of the sections of the novel, but Robert Duvall gives an excellent portrayal of Bull Meechum. Students can see that other characters do spot endearing aspects of Bull's personality that may be missed in the novel.

The book deals with one of the most flawed characters in literature. Amazingly, my students invariably end up liking one aspect of Bull Meechum and ultimately lament his death at the end of the novel. The movie plays upon the more humanistic side of Bull and gives the viewer that sense of sympathy that is strange. Considering that they have read so much about Bull's insensitivity, why do we lament his passing?

I use this movie to show how different a movie can be from a novel. In addition, we discuss omissions from the plot and how important they are to the telling of the story and how it changes the ultimate feelings surrounding the movie and the novel. I also have my students read Pat Conroy's autobiographical novel called "My Losing Season". In it, Conroy details the true stories that served as the basis for Santini. Unfortunately, his father was the inspiration. Sadly, his father was even worse in real life than the fictional account of Bull Meechum.

Bigotry, insensitivity, mental, spousal, and child abuse are all sensitive subjects addressed in the novel and the movie. However, it is done so in a monolithic fashion embodied in one character. Bull Meechum serves as a lightning rod of commentary on these subjects. By having one character embody all of these traits, students are able to discuss his shortcomings and explain why what Bull says and does is so wrong. The reality of this novel and the movie is that ultimately the students may be going through similar injustices in their own lives. Powerful stuff.
Stephen Dent, Teacher, Wilmington, DE. Suggested grades: 9-11. See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription. [LI]

The Great Sinner    (1949) No MPAA Rating; Director: Robert Siodmak.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

The Great Train Robbery    (1903) No MPAA Rating; Director: Edwin S. Porter.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Greed    (1924) No MPAA Rating; Director: Erich von Stroheim.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Green Mile    (1999) MPAA Rating: R for violence, language and some sex-related material. Director: Frank Darabont.     This film is based on a Stephen King novel about the prison guards on a death row and an inmate with magical powers. [ITO] (JAF)

The Grey Fox    (1982) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Philip Borsos.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Grizzly Man    (2005) MPAA Rating: R for language; Director: Werner Herzog.     This is a documentary about the life of Timothy Treadwell and his death at the hands of the bears he loved. The best parts of the movie are Treadwell's incredible footage of grizzlies and the questions the film raises about whether his actions were really respectful to the bears. However, all that there was to say in this film could have been said in about 15 or 20 minutes, but it is stretched out seemingly endlessly. Treadwell was a very strange man and his insistence on placing himself in danger so frequently smacks of mental illness rather than true commitment. The director/script writer makes most of the film overly dramatic. A former girlfriend and employee cries for Treadwell repeatedly. (One of the "highlights" of the film is a staged scene in which the filmmaker presents the watch Treadwell was wearing when he was eaten to the former girlfriend/employee, and she cries. Another is when she listens to the tape of the final moments of his life, and cries. We don't get to hear it.) The coroner describes the bodies as they came in. We think kids would laugh at the over the top elements of the film and eventually be plain bored. We were. [ITO, NA] (JAF)

Groundhog Day        A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Guess Who's Coming To Dinner    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Guilty As Sin    (1993) MPAA Rating: R for violence, language and some sexuality; Director: Sidney Lumet.    See the section on this movie in Reel Justice.

Gulag    (1984) No MPAA Rating; Director: Roger Young.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Gulliver's Travels    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Gun Crazy (or Deadly Is the Female)    (1949) No MPAA Rating; Director: Joseph H. Lewis.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Gunfight at the O.K. Corral    (1957) No MPAA Rating; Director: John Sturges.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

The Gunfighter    (195) No MPAA Rating; Director: Henry King.    See the sections on this movie in History Goes to the Movies and Past Imperfect.

Gunga Din    (1939) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: George Stevens.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Guys and Dolls    (1955) No MPAA Rating; Director: Joseph L. Mankiewicz.    This film is ranked #23 on the American Film Institute's List of the Greatest Movie Musicals of All Time (2006).



A,    B,   C,   D,   E,   F,   H,    I,    J,   KLM,  
N,   O,   P,   Q,   R,   S,   T,   U,   VW,   XY,   Z   




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