Notes on Movies for Which a Learning Guide has Not
Been Written -- Titles Starting with the Letter "I"


A,   B,   C,   D,   E,   F,   G,   H,    J,   KLM,  
N,   O,   P,   Q,   R,   S,   T,   U,   VW,   XY,   Z   

For the meanings of the initials in brackets at the end of many of the entries, click here.



I Am    (2010) Not rated: Approved; Director: Tom Shadyac.     Writer director Tom Shadyac was on top of the world, a great career as a film director, lived in a mansion, had anything money could buy — and then he had a bicycle accident and suffered from post concussion syndrome. When he recovers, he wants to answer the questions, "What's wrong with our world?" and "What can we do about it?" He speaks with eminent scholars (e.g. Noam Chomsky) and public figures (e.g. Desmond Tutu) looking for the answers. There's a lot of very good information in this film but there is also a lot of weird stuff that doesn't really hold up to scrutiny. A good critique of the film is by the late Roger Ebert at Roger Ebert's Reviews at the Chicago Sun-Times. The film was recommended by an experienced teacher but it should be used very carefully, and certainly in conjunction with the points made in Ebert's review.Perhaps that would be a good guide. [LI] (JAF, 2013)

I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang    (1932) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: Mervyn LeRoy.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

I Am Love     (2009) MPAA Rating: R for sexuality and nudity; Director Luca Guadagnino.     This is a sophisticated Italian film about a the disintegration of a wealthy Italian family. It's not that interesting to audiences other than Italians, and perhaps not to them.[NR] (JAF, 2012)

I Am Sam    (2001) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for language; Director: Jessie Nelson.     This film has been recommended by teacher, but TWM disagrees. The premise of the movie is that a mentally handicapped man with the intelligence of a seven-year-old is capable of raising his daughter of normal intelligence just because he loves her, is patient with her, is always there for her, and has her best interests at heart. It would be nice if life was so easy. While these attributes are essential for good parenting, adults of normal and superior intelligence need to bring all of their faculties and resources to bear to raise children in a modern world. A man with the intelligence of a seven-year-old won't be able to protect or guide a child, particularly, a teenager. Also, the last section of the film is overly long. This film has strengths in its portrayal of the disabled as full-fledged human beings and in its acknowledgement of the importance of Sam's strengths as a parent. Certainly, Sam is a better parent than someone who abuses,abandons, fails to love, lacks patience, etc. However, his lack of intelligence could be fatal for his daughter and would limit her possibilities in life. In any case, if anyone has ideas about how to use this movie in health or ELA classes, we'd be interested in hearing them, but for now, we can't recommend this film. [NR] (JAF,2012)

I Confess    (1953) No MPAA Rating; Director: Alfred Hitchcock.    See the section on this movie in Reel Justice.

I Don't Know How She Does It   (2011) Rated: PG-13; Director: Douglas McGrath This is a moderately entertaining movie about a modern-day woman who is trying, unsuccessfully, to be both a good mom and to advance in a cut-throat Wall Street career which requires travel and work on nights and weekends. She has a great and accommodating husband. Through the course of the film she has success in her job that allows her to set limits with her employer before she loses her husband and the love of her children. The movie raises many good issues for modern day young women and families but resolves them through fortuitous circumstances that most people will not experience. An adult showing this film to children should note that most two-parent families will not be as lucky as the family this film and that in order for parents to be "good enough", hard choices may have to be made by one or both between career and family. (JAF/DEF 2012) (LI)

I Know My First Name Is Steven    (1989) No MPAA Rating; Director: Larry Elikann.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

I'm Dancing As Fast As I Can    (1982) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Jack Hofsiss.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

I Never Sang For My Father    (1970) MPAA Rating: PG for thematic material, language and a scene of sensuality; Director: Gilbert Cates.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry    (2007) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for crude sexual content throughout, nudity, language and drug references; Director: Dennis Dugan.    This is an Adam Sandler vehicle with the usual gross and disgusting jokes that ruin the film as something for adults to suggest to children. [NR] (JAF & DEF)

I, Robot    (2004) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for intense stylized action, and some brief partial nudity; Director: Alex Proyas.    This is a nice detective action flick without too much gore. There are lots of chase scenes and lots of violence but most of it is against robots. The three rules and the robot with a heart are interesting but that's about as far as it goes. Almost, but not quite enough to justify a Learning Guide. [ITO] (JAF & DEF)

I Want To Live!    (1958) No MPAA Rating; Director: Robert Wise.    See the section on this movie in Reel Justice.

I Will Fight No More Forever    (1975) No MPAA Rating; Director: Richard T. Heffron.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Ice Princess    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

An Ideal Husband    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Ike: The War Years    (1978) No MPAA Rating; Director: Melville Shavelson and Boris Sagal.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Imitation of Life    (1934) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: John M. Stahl.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Immediate Family    (1989) MPAA Rating: PG-13; Director: Jonathan Kaplan.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

The Immigrant    (1917) No MPAA Rating; Director: Charles Chaplin.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Immortal Beloved    (1994) MPAA Rating: R for scenes of violence and sexuality; Director: Bernard Rose.     This film is about the life of Beethoven. It explores adult subjects, displays breasts and has a scene in which a couple is interrupted while making love. It shows violence between brothers. We have not checked the accuracy of the historical accounts in this film. While the movie is interesting in many ways we think that it is suitable for an audience older than 15 years. We suggest two alternates: "Amadeus", or for children ages 9 - 12, "Beethoven Lives Upstairs". [PD]

The Importance Of Being Earnest    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Impromptu    (1991) MPAA Rating: PG-13; Director: James Lapine.     This is an entertaining film about Frederic Chopin and Georges Sand but we found that it had no real substance and showed a free love atmosphere, something beyond a broad parental consensus. We suggest, as alternatives: "Amadeus" or for children ages 6 - 12 any of the Composers' Specials. [PD]

In a Lonely Place    (1950) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: Nicholas Ray.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

In America    (2001) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for some sexuality, drug references, brief violence and language; Director: Jim Sheridan.     This film makes the A+ list. It's about love and grieving for a child who has died. It has the capacity to help people heal psychological wounds. There is one passionate love-making scene between the parents that adults who show this movie to children may want to edit out. Someday we hope to prepare a Learning Guide for this film. [LI]

In Harm's Way    (1965) No MPAA Rating; Director: Otto Preminger.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

In Her Shoes    (2005) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for thematic material, language and some sexual content; Director: Curtis Hanson.     This is a reasonably good portrayal of two sisters with a difficult relationship and a dysfunctional family. It has several worthwhile themes with good models for forgiving, responsibility, friendship, and personal growth. It shows the unpleasant side of binge drinking. One excellent feature of the movie is that the romantic female lead is not portrayed as particularly beautiful. Another is the use of poetry to illustrate how confidence can help heal relationships. Because of several scenes showing sexual situations (not very explicitly) this film should be shown only to relatively sophisticated chldren 14 years or older. All in all this movie is very worthwhile for the right kids in many families. The book is based on the novel by Jennifer Weiner. [PD] (JAF & DEF) TWM has taken the brief parts of the movie in which one of the sisters recites poetry and created a Snippet Lesson Plan on Analysis and Explication of Poetry using "In Her Shoes".

In The Best Interest Of The Children    (1994) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Michael Ray Rhodes.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

In The Heat Of The Night    (1967) No MPAA Rating; Director: Norman Jewison.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. Suggested by a TWM User. [LI]

In the Land of the Head Hunters    (1914) No MPAA Rating; Director: Edward S. Curtis.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

In the Name of the Father    (1993) MPAA Rating: R for language and politically-generated violence; Director: Jim Sheridan.    Not an accurate portrayal of the conflict between the IRA and the British and very violent. See the sections on this movie in Reel v. Real: How Hollywood Turns Fact Into Fiction, History Goes to the Movies and Reel Justice. [PD]

In the Street    (1948/1952) No MPAA Rating; Director: Ed Howard.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

In Which We Serve    (1942) No MPAA Rating; Director: Noel Coward, David Lean.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Indochine    (1992); MPAA Rating: PG-13 for some violence, sensuality and drug related scenes; Director: Régis Wargnier.    This is a beautiful film about love in French Indochina in the 1930s. It deals with adult themes and we don't think it appropriate for children. Certainly, parents should view this film before allowing children to see it. See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies. [PD]

Inherit The Wind    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

The Inner Circle    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Inner Space    (1987) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Joe Dante.    "An excellent film to teach human anatomy with." Michelle McDaniel, Teacher, Missouri.

Frontline: Inside the Jury Room    (1986) No MPAA Rating; No Director Listed. This documentary shows the deliberations of a jury which exercises its right to jury nullification (a jury bringing back a not guilty verdict when the defendant is clearly guilty, i.e., the jury nullifies the law). Because of the unique set of facts in the film, the result reached by the jury led to justice being done. However, the issue of jury nullification is extremely troublesome and, after extensive research, we could not reach a conclusion about whether jury nullification was a good thing in a functioning democracy or how to present this topic to a high school level class. The film is just the beginning of an analysis of this issue and if seen without extensive additional materials, it will leave a misimpression about jury nullification. Therefore, TWM does not recommend this film as a teaching tool for high school students. For adults who are interested in the issue, college or law school level classes and as a part of a larger presentation, the movie might be excellent. [NR] (JAF, 2007)

The Insider    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

The Interpreter    (2005) MPAA: Rated PG-13 for violence, some sexual content and brief strong language; Director: Sydney Pollack.    This is a slick but compelling terrorism mystery involving the U.N., a murderous dictator of an African country, an interpreter, and a Secret Service agent assigned to protect them both. The film could be used to teach a few lessons about the U.N. and how it works, and to give children a visual sense of the United Nations. However, we didn't think it was worth the time and effort required for a Learning Guide. [PD] (JAF)

Into the West    (2005) No MPAA Rating; Director: Robert Dornhelm, Sergio Mimica-Gezzan.    Suggested by a TWM User.

Into the West    (1992) MPAA Rating: PG for some mild language and violence; Director: Mike Newell.    Suggested by a TWM User.

Into the Wild    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Intolerance    (1916) No MPAA Rating; Director: D.W. Griffith.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Invasion of the Body Snatchers    (1956) No MPAA Rating; Director: Don Siegel.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Invention of Lying    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Iron Jawed Angels    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

The Iron Horse    (1924) No MPAA Rating; Director: John Ford.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

The Iron Triangle    (1989) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Eric Weston.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Iron Will    (1994) MPAA Rating: PG for adventure action; Director: Charles Haid.    Suggested by a TWM User.

Ironclads    (1991) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Delbert Mann.    Suggested by a TWM User. See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Ironweed    (1987) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Hector Babenco.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Irony of Fate    (1975) No MPAA Rating; Director: Eldar Ryazanov.    Recommended by Asia, a teacher from Russia. [LI]

The Island    (2005) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for intense sequences of violence and action, some sexuality and language; Director: Michael Bay.     This is another exploration of the possible future of society where people can be cloned. It poses an interesting question of whether cloned people who have consciousness should have rights. The last half of the film is really a series of chases and violent encounters as the protagonists attempt to avoid their fate. It could have been cut down to half its size and the violence eliminated. [ITO] (JAF & DEF, 2006)

It    (1927) No MPAA Rating; Director: Clarence G. Badger.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

It Could Happen to You    (1994) MPAA Rating: PG for mild language and a scene of cop action; Director: Andrew Bergman.     We could not find any content in this film. See the section on this movie in Reel Justice. For recommended films relating to the U.S. legal system, see the Subject Matter Index under United States/The Law [ITO]

It Happened One Night    (1934) No MPAA Rating; Director: Frank Capra.    This is one of those innocent and entertaining, classic American comedy-love stories of the 1930s with two of the great stars of that era: Claudette Colbert and Clark Gable. He plays a reporter in need of a story and she an heiress on the run from her father and looking for anonymity. It is ranked #35 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006). It is ranked #8 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. [ITO] (JAF, 2013)

It's A Gift    (1934) No MPAA Rating; Director: Norman Z. McLeod.    This film is ranked #58 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006).

It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World    (1963) MPAA Rating: G; Director: Stanley Kramer.    This film is ranked #40 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is hilarious and great entertainment for kids and adults. It features most of the great comedians of the post-WW II era. We could not find a way to make it useful for teaching. There are a number of great comedies with substance listed on the site, they include: "Cool Runnings", "The Russians Are Coming! The Russians are Coming!" and "Modern Times". [NA] (JAF)

It's A Wonderful Life    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

The Italian    (1915) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: Reginald Barker.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Italian    (2005) MPAA Rating: Rated PG-13 for some violence, sexual content, language and thematic issues; Director: Andrei Kravchuk.    This movie is a subtle, finely observed story about a young orphan living in post-Soviet Union Russia. Vanya's mother had abandoned him when he was an infant. After an Italian couple decides to adopt him, he sets out on a quest to find his biological mother before it is too late. The people who make their living as adoption brokers are just as determined to find him and bring him back. The ending of the film is sweet and breathtaking, but its real advantage is that it paints a world which, while it is stressed and focused on the pursuit of money, is also full of offhanded goodness and unexpected decency. For every money-driven child hunter, there is an adult who looks out for Vanya on the street, and one of those hunters does a gratifying about-face. The older kids at the orphanage punish him when he hoards money for his breakaway (they pool virtually everything), but their communal outlook includes taking care of one another. They encourage Vanya to see the great advantage of adoption by a loving couple and a life in the paradise of Italy. When it is clear that he will not be happy if he does not attempt his quest, one of the girls, a prostitute with a heart of gold, helps him escape. While the tone of "The Italian" may be too subtly realistic and slow-moving for many children, it can serve as a much needed antidote to the steady diet of violence and cartoonish heroics that young people consume in so many mainstream movies.

This film does not have enough content to justify spending class time on it. Teachers of courses dealing with life in contemporary Russia, with parental permission, might want to show this film as a treat or reward. Parents, after viewing the film on their own, might want to show it to their children. [ITO, PD] (JAF & DEF)

Frank Capra Ivan Vasilyevich Changes Occupation    (1973) No MPAA Rating; Director: Leonid Gaidai.    Recommended by Asia, a teacher from Russia. [LI]



A,    B,   C,   D,   E,   F,   G,   H,    J,   KLM,  
N,   O,   P,   Q,   R,   S,   T,   U,   VW,   XY,   Z   




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