Notes on Movies for Which a Learning Guide has Not
Been Written -- Titles Starting with the Letter "J"


A,   B,   C,   D,   E,   F,   G,   H,    I,    KLM,  
N,   O,   P,   Q,   R,   S,   T,   U,   VW,   XY,   Z   

For the meanings of the initials in brackets at the end of many of the entries, click here.



Jackass: The Movie    (2002) MPAA Rating: R for dangerous, sometimes extremely crude stunts, language and nudity; Director: Jeff Tremaine.    See the entry for this film in Reading in the Reel World: Teaching Documentaries and Other Nonfiction Texts by John Golden, National Council of Teachers of English, 2006. (JAF & DEF)

The Jackie Robinson Story    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Jagged Edge    (1985) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Richard Marquand.    See the section on this movie in Reel Justice.

Jailhouse Rock    (1957) No MPAA Rating; Director: Richard Thorpe.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Jam Session    (1942) No MPAA Rating; Director: Josef Berne.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

James' Journey To Jerusalem    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Jammin' the Blues    (1944) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: Gjon Mili.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Jane Austen Book Club    (2007) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for mature thematic material, sexual content, brief strong language and some drug use; Director: Robin Swicord.     This is an entertaining and subtle romantic comedy designed for Jane Austen junkies. The themes are sophisticated and knowledge of Jane Austen's books is essential to fully appreciate the film. For college classes in Austen, this movie will be a great treat at the end of the course. (JAF & DEF, 2008)

Jason and the Argonauts    (1963) MPAA Rating: G; Director: Don Chaffey.    Suggested by a TWM User.

Jason's Lyric    (1994) MPAA Rating: R for strong violence, sexuality and language, and for drug use; Director: Doug McHenry.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Jaws    (1975) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Steven Spielberg.    This film is ranked #48 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. A teacher who is an expert at using film in the classroom has developed a way to use scenes from this movie for certain activities. See Reading in the Dark, by John Golden, 2001, National Council of Teachers of English.

Jazz on a Summer's Day    (1960) No MPAA Rating; Directors: Aram Avakian and Bert Stern.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Jazz Singer    1927 version. A Learning Guide has been prepared for this historically significant movie. This is Al Jolson's classic and the first commercially successful "talkie".

Jeffries-Johnson World's Championship Boxing Contest    (1910) No MPAA Rating; Producer: J. Stuart Blackton.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Jeremiah Johnson    (1972) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Sydney Pollack.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

The Jerk    (1979) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Carl Reiner.    This film is ranked #89 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006).

Jesus of Montreal    (1985) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Denys Arcand.     French with English subtitles; a small section is in English with French subtitles. Because of its depiction of sexuality, the film is not suitable for adults to show to most children under age 16. Jesus of Montreal is an engaging allegory of the Passion of Christ as reinterpreted by a ragtag group of young actors in Montreal. Hired to "freshen up" a creaking and overwrought version of the Stations of the Cross by a sinner of a priest, the lives of the thespians take on aspects of the story they decide to play, that of the historically documented Jesus (called Yeshu Ben Panthera). This puts them at odds with the priest, who fears that tampering with dogma will incur the wrath of the archdiocese. As the actors immerse themselves in their roles, a dedication to the truths they are conveying begins to transform them. This is especially true of Daniel Coulombe, the actor/director who portrays Christ. ("Colombe" is French for dove, a common symbol of the Holy Spirit). There are many fine touches of allegorical irony: Mirielle, the girl who plays the harlot Mary Magdalene, is afraid that she is nothing but a body to be cast in semi-pornographic commercials. One of the actors who will be "called" to the play is introduced as he is munching a doughnut and doing voice-overs for a hard-core porn flick. "Christ" explodes in rage at a very contemporary and cynical assembly of moneychangers, the flesh peddling commercial film producers. In the end, the gifts of life and love he leaves reflect the core values of the Christian religion applied to an up-to-the-minute reality. While it is clear that the filmmakers intended to produce a testament to the enduring and transforming power of Christ's story, the film may not appeal to conservative Christians who might find the film's implied criticism of the clergy and its challenges to traditional beliefs offensive. [PD] (JAF)

Jesus Of Nazareth    (1977) No MPAA Rating; Director: Franco Zeffirelli.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

JFK    (1991) MPAA Rating: R for language; Director: Oliver Stone.     This film takes many liberties with the truth and oversells itself as presenting fact. Seen in its best light, the film is a speculation about history which includes much supposition and imagination. Some teachers have used it to stimulate discussion about the JFK assassination. If this is done, careful research should be undertaken beforehand to separate the fact from the fiction. See the sections on this movie in Reel v. Real: How Hollywood Turns Fact Into Fiction, Past Imperfect, History Goes to the Movies, and History by Hollywood: The Use and Abuse of the American Past. [PD]

Joan of Arc    (1948) No MPAA Rating; Director: Victor Fleming.    See the sections on this movie in Reel v. Real: How Hollywood Turns Fact Into Fiction and Past Imperfect.

John Paul Jones    (1959) No MPAA Rating; Director: John Farrow.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

John Rambo    (2008- Filming); Directed, Produced, and Screenplay by: Sylvester Stallone.    Mr. Stallone reportedly received $500,000 from a tobacco company in return for his agreement to use tobacco products during five of his movies. We find this conduct to be reprehensible. Before showing any Stallone film to children, disclose Mr. Stallone's shameful conduct and warn them about smoking. [NR]

Jo Jo Dancer, Your Life Is Calling    (1986) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Richard Pryor.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Josephine Baker Story    (1990) MPAA Rating: R for sensuality; Director: Brian Gibson.    A wonderful film about a pioneering black entertainer which we would have seriously evaluated for historical accuracy except for the many scenes of topless dancing and some fairly explicit sexual scenes. [PD] (JAF & DEF)

Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat    (1999) No MPAA Rating; Director: Robert Zemeckis.    Suggested by a TWM User.

Journey to the Center of the Earth     (1959) MPAA Rating: G; Director: Howard Levin.    This is an entertaining film for younger children, but it has only a superficial relationship to the book. The following elements which assume importance in the film do not appear in the book: the subplot about a competing expedition, the kidnapping in a horse drawn carriage; women members of the expedition; and a duck named "Gertrude." Moreover, we couldn't find any good science in this film. [ITO] (JAF)

The Joy Luck Club    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Judgment At Nuremberg    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Julius Caesar    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Jungle Fever    (1991) MPAA Rating: R for sensuality, strong language, drug content, and for violence; Director: Spike Lee.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Juno    (2007) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for mature thematic material, sexual content and language; Director: Jason Reitman.     This movie should not be shown to children by parents. It is rife with bad messages and omissions which skew the portrait of life painted by the movie. The movie treats an unexpected pregnancy for a teenage girl as pretty much of a lark. Juno's boyfriend, the father of the child is treated as a complete non-entity when it comes to decisions about what will happen to his child, nor is there any recognition that he has responsibility or feeling for the child. Non-existent is the grief that any mother feels when giving up her child, nor are we shown any of the ill-effects of Juno's repression of these feelings. [NR] (JAF & DEF, 2008)

Jurassic Park    (1993) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for intense science fiction terror; Director: Steven Spielberg.    Suggested by a TWM User. See the section on this movie in Past Imperfect.



A,    B,   C,   D,   E,   F,   G,   H,    I,    KLM,  
N,   O,   P,   Q,   R,   S,   T,   U,   VW,   XY,   Z   




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