Notes on Movies for Which a Learning Guide has Not
Been Written -- Titles Starting with the Letter "M"


A,   B,   C,   D,   E,   F,   G,   H,   I,   J,   KL
N,   O,   P,   Q,   R,   S,   T,   U,   VW,   XY,   Z   

For the meanings of the initials in brackets at the end of many of the entries, click here.



M    (1931) No MPAA Rating; Director: Fritz Lang.    See the section on this movie in Reel Justice.

MacArthur    (1977) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Joseph Sargent.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Macbeth    (1948) No MPAA Rating; Director: Orson Welles.    Suggested by a TWM User.

Mad Hot Ballroom    (2005) MPAA Rating: PG for some thematic elements; Director: Marilyn Agrelo.    See the entry for this film in Reading in the Reel World: Teaching Documentaries and Other Nonfiction Texts by John Golden, National Council of Teachers of English, 2006. (JAF & DEF)

Madame Curie    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

M.A.D.D.: Mother's Against Drunk Driving    (1983) No MPAA Rating; Director: William A. Graham.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Made In Heaven    (1987) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Alan Rudolph.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

The Madness of King George    (1994) MPAA Rating: Rated PG-13 for thematic elements; Director: Nicholas Hytner.    See the sections on this movie in Reel v. Real: How Hollywood Turns Fact Into Fiction and History Goes to the Movies. We found the film to be pretentious and dull focusing on the health of a tyrant who had lost most of North America. [NA] (JAF)

Magical Maestro    (1952) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: Tex Avery.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Magnificent Ambersons    (1942) MPAA Rating: TV-PG; Director: Orson Welles.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Making of an American    (1920) No MPAA Rating; Director: Guy Hedlund.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Malcolm X    (1992) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for a scene of violence, and for drugs and some language; Director: Spike Lee.    Suggested by a TWM User. See the sections on this movie in Reel v. Real: How Hollywood Turns Fact Into Fiction, History Goes to the Movies, and Past Imperfect. [LI]

Maltese Falcon    (1941) No MPAA Rating; Director: John Huston.    This film is ranked #23 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. Suggested by a TWM User.

Mama Flora's Family    (1998) No MPAA Rating; Director: Peter Werner.    "I believe there is a need for more films geared to African-Americans. I teach African-American history and I subscribed to your site with the hopes of finding some ideas for lesson plans to movies that depict slavery and the African-American Experience in general. I appreciate your site and I hope that you will add more of these types of movies. This week I am showing 'Mama Flora's Family' and I will be showing my higher grades, Solomon Northup's 'Odyssey'. These are two of the many films that I believe should be on the site." Shereeta Stroud, Teacher, Philadelphia, PA. Suggested grades: 7 - 12.

A Man Called Horse     (1970) MPAA Rating: R for violence and nudity; Director: Elliot Silverstein     This film is loosely based on a short story by Dorothy M. Johnson. The short story is by far better than the movie. The film alternates interesting and apparently reasonably authentic Native American rituals with a degrading and almost comical view of Native Americans. We don't think children will tolerate this film. In addition it is properly rated R for nudity and violence. NR (JAF, 2009)

A Man For All Seasons    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

The Man in the Iron Mask    (1998) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for sequences of violence and some sensuality/nudity; Director: Randall Wallace.     This is an entertaining swashbuckler set early in the reign of Louis XIV in the 17th century in which the Three Musketeers and D'Artagnan save the monarchy. There was a man in a mask (probably not iron) who was imprisoned by Louis XIV who ordered that his identity be kept secret. As the movie admits, that's about all that is known about him. [LI] (JAF, 2008)

Man In The Wilderness    (1971) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Richard C. Sarafian.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

A Man of No Importance    (1994) MPAA Rating: R for a scene of sexuality; Director: Suri Krishnamma.     The film is slow moving. We do not think children will tolerate it. [NA] (JAF)

Man on Fire    (2004) MPAA Rating: R for language and strong violence.; Director: Tony Scott     This film is properly rated and is not suitable for adults to recommend to children. NR (PAEF, 2009) However, there is a 22 minute snippet, without any violence, that clearly shows the operation of the child savior myth. TWM has developed two lesson plans from this portion of the movie:
The Man Who Never Was    (1956) No MPAA Rating; Director: Ronald Neame.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance    (1962) No MPAA Rating; Director: John Ford.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. A teacher who is an expert at using film in the classroom has developed a way to use scenes from this movie for certain activities. See Reading in the Dark, by John Golden, 2001, National Council of Teachers of English. We have not reviewed this movie.

The Man With The Golden Arm    (1955) No MPAA Rating; Director: Otto Preminger.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

The Man Without A Face    (1993) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for mature subject matter; Director: Mel Gibson.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

The Manchurian Candidate    (1962) No MPAA Rating; Director: John Frankenheimer.    This film is ranked #67 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. It is a political thriller with cold war paranoia as a backdrop. The movie is not really relevant for today and contains an unnecessarily violent final scene. We have not seen the more contemporary 2004 version of this film. See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Manhatta    (1921) No MPAA Rating; Directors: Charles Sheeler and Paul Strand.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Manhattan    (1979) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Woody Allen.    This film is ranked #46 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

March of the Penguins    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

March of Time: Inside Nazi Germany    (1938) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: Jack Glenn.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Marian Anderson: The Lincoln Memorial Concert    (1939) No MPAA Rating; Director: Unlisted.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Marie Curie: More Than Meets The Eye    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

The Marriage of Figaro    (1959) No MPAA Rating; Director: Jean Meyer.    Suggested by a TWM User.

The Martian Chronicles    (1980) No MPAA Rating; Director: Michael Anderson.    Suggested by a TWM User.

Marty    (1955) No MPAA Rating; Director: Delbert Mann.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Mary Poppins    (1964) MPAA Rating: G; Director: Robert Stevenson.    This film is ranked #6 on the American Film Institute's List of the Greatest Movie Musicals of All Time (2006).

Masada    (1981) No MPAA Rating; Director: Boris Sagal.    Suggested by a TWM User. See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

M*A*S*H    (1970) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Robert Altman.    This film is ranked #56 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006). It is ranked #7 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Mask of Zorro    (1998) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for some intense action and violence; Director: Martin Campbell.    The movie is unnecessarily violent and not important enough to subject children to it. There is also a suicide shown in this film. [ITO] (JAF)

Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World    (2003) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for intense battle sequences, related images, and brief language; Director: Peter Weir.    This movie was developed from the popular series of sea story novels by Patrick O'Brien about the British Navy during its heyday. The film consists of one engagement of battling ships after another. It has little character development and a skimpy plot. If a child does watch this film, you can talk about the British Empire, the conflicts between the British and the French, during the Napoleonic wars, and the role of sea power in that conflict. [ITO] (JAF)

Master Hands    (1936) No MPAA Rating; Director: Unlisted.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Match Point    (2005) MPAA Rating: R for some sexuality. Director: Woody Allen.     This is a charming, well acted, well directed and well written thriller about love and greed. It's good entertainment. [ITO] (JAF)

Matewan    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Matrimony's Speed Limit    (1913) No MPAA Rating; Director: Alice Guy.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Matrix    (1999) MPAA Rating: R for sci-fi violence and brief language; Directors: Andy and Larry Wachowksi.    Children love this film and we have been told that it presents issues of appearance vs. reality and free will vs. the power of fate. The violence is unnecessary and therefore gratuitous. [ITO] (JAF)

The Mayflower Voyagers    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Me, You and Everyone We Know    (2005) MPAA Rating: R for disturbing sexual content involving children, and for language; Director: Miranda July.     We found this film to be simply disgusting for its unnecessary use of gutter profanity and references to sex involving children. It has been a long time since we've had such a strong negative reaction to a movie. We didn't finish watching it. [NR] (JAF)

Mean Girls    (2004) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for sexual content, language and some teen partying; Director: Mark Waters.    Suggested by a TWM User.

Mean Streets    (1973) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Martin Scorsese.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Medicine Man    (1992) MPAA Rating: PG-13; Director: John McTiernan.    "This movie is excellent for environmental science. Although there are native women shown bare breasted, the reality of tribal customs and the fight to keep the environment from being destroyed outweighs these scenes (especially for high school students). A lesson can be learned about field research and the plight of the rainforests." Darla Crosby, Teacher, Savannah, GA. Suggested grades: 9-12. [LI] (DEF)

Medium Cool    (1969) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Haskell Wexler.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. Suggested by a TWM User. See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Meet Me in St. Louis    (1944) No MPAA Rating; Director: Vincente Minnelli.    This film is ranked #10 on the American Film Institute's List of the Greatest Movie Musicals of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Melody Ranch    (1940) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: Joseph Santley.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Memories of Me    (1981) No MPAA Rating; Director: Henry Winkler.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Memory of Us    (1974) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: H. Kaye Dyal.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Memphis Belle    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Men Don't Tell    (1993) No MPAA Rating; Director: Harry Winer.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Men In War    (1957) No MPAA Rating; Director: Anthony Mann.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Men of the Fighting Lady    (1954) No MPAA Rating; Director: Andrew Marton.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

The Men's Club    (1986) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Peter Medak.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

The Merchant of Venice    (2004) MPAA Rating: R for some nudity; Director: Michael Radford.    This is an extraordinarily good film and the reason we don't recommend it is that throughout the film the prostitutes of Venice are shown with their breasts rouged and exposed. In addition, on occasion the prostitutes are shown being groped by their clients. This, according to the director, is a historically accurate touch. The acting, direction, set design and music are all excellent. Pacino's Shylock is deep and profound. It will be the definitive Shylock for many, many decades. Jeremy Irons' Antonio brings out more than one could ever imagine for this character. Lynn Collins' Portia is brilliant. The other actors in the film are also excellent. There is not a single weak role. The interpretation of the play is extremely rich. It shows: (1) Shakespeare's interest in the problems of revenge, a topic explored in other plays such as Romeo and Juliet and comprehensively dealt with in Hamlet; (2) the conflict between two cultures that live side-by-side but do not know each other; and (3) the contrast of the homosexual attraction between Antonio and Bassanio and the pull on Bassanio of Portion and his marriage vows. For those who would like to use the movie in class, the producers have provided an Official Teacher's Guide. [PD] (JAF & DEF)

Merlin    (1998) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Steve Barron.    "...[A]s one interested in and familiar with the Arthurian legends, I have watched Merlin and found it generally surprisingly faithful to the legends. Naturally, it has made some sacrifices in the way of accuracy for the sake of the film, but all the characters and sub-plots (except for the abduction of Nimue) have firm basis in the legends. It is rare, in fact, that such an accurate portrayal of Gawaine can be found." Joanna Chan, Singapore. [LI]

Merril's Marauders    (1962) No MPAA Rating; Director: Samuel Fuller.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Meshes of the Afternoon    (1943) No MPAA Rating; Directors: Maya Deren and Alexander Hammid.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Messenger: The Story of Joan of Arc    (1999) MPAA Rating: Rated R for strong graphic battles, a rape and some language.; Director: Luc Besson.    See the section on this movie in Reel v. Real: How Hollywood Turns Fact Into Fiction.

Mi Familia    (1995) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Gregory Nava.    "Movies like this are an urgent need in our diversity classes." Tina, Teacher, Tulsa, OK. Suggested grades: age 18 and up. [PD]

Michael Collins    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

A Midnight Clear    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Midnight Cowboy    (1969) MPAA Rating: R; Director: John Schlesinger.    This film is ranked #36 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Midnight in Paris    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

A Midsummer Night's Dream    (1935) No MPAA Rating; Director: Max Reinhardt.    This is a good film but inaccessible for children. Try one of the following wonderfully accessible Shakespearean Comedies: "Twelfth Night" and "Much Ado About Nothing". [NA] (JAF)

Midway    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

The Mighty    (1999) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for elements of violence and peril; Director: Barry Sonnenfeld.     This is an excellent film about friendship, disability, illness, and love. The lessons all relate to social-emotional learning and we see little formal curriculum potential for this movie. [LI] (JAF)

Mighty Like A Moose    (1926) No MPAA Rating; Director: Leo McCarey.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Mighty Quinn    (1989) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Carl Schenkel.    This is an early vehicle for Denzel Washington. The movie is delightful until towards the end, when you realize that its message is fundamentally racist: all the white characters are bad and the only good characters are black. Many people miss the racism and love the movie. [NR] (JAF)

Mildred Pierce    (1945) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: Michael Curtiz.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Millions    (2004) MPAA Rating: PG for thematic elements, language, some peril and mild sensuality; Director: Danny Boyle.    "The movie is excellent for illustration of the virtue of honesty, family, and coping with loss." by Maureen Eberle, Drexel Hill, PA. Another comment: "'Millions' is a great film to have students look at moral decision making." by Ted from Ontario. Suggested grades: 9 - 12 [LI]

Miracle    (2004) MPAA Rating: PG for language and some rough sports action; Director: Gavin O'Connor.    Suggested by a TWM User. Suggested grades: 3 and up. [LI]

Miracle on 34th Street    (1947) No MPAA Rating; Director: George Seaton.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. See the section on this movie in Reel Justice.

Miracle of Life (Nova)    (2000) No MPAA Rating     A teacher reports that "this movie is too long and boring for both the students and teacher. Soft music and ocean photography leads to sleeping students. ")

The Miracle of Morgan's Creek    (1944) No MPAA Rating; Director: Preston Sturges.    This film is ranked #54 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Miracle Worker    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

The Mirror    (1993) No MPAA Rating; Director: Deepak Sareen.    Suggested by a TWM User.

Miss Lulu Bett    (1921) No MPAA Rating; Director: William C. de Mille.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Missing    (1982) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Costa-Gavras.    See the sections on this movie in Reel v. Real: How Hollywood Turns Fact Into Fiction and History by Hollywood: The Use and Abuse of the American Past.

The Mission    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Mission of the Shark    (1991) No MPAA Rating; Director: Robert Iscove.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Mississippi Burning     (1988) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Alan Parker. This film describes some of the social tensions in the South during the Civil Rights Movement. However, it presents an inaccurate picture of the FBI's efforts to find the killers of the three civil rights workers, Schwerner, Goodman and Chaney. The film makes it seem that progress in Civil Rights (especially in Mississippi in the summer of 1964) was attained by the FBI using violent and illegal tactics, rather than by black people themselves, Civil Rights activists (both black and white), and aroused national public opinion. The FBI broke the murder case using standard investigation techniques and by offering monetary rewards for information. They did not, as shown in the film, resort to violence and intimidation. See the sections on this film in Reel v. Real: How Hollywood Turns Fact Into Fiction, History Goes to the Movies, Past Imperfect, and History by Hollywood: The Use and Abuse of the American Past. A much more historically accurate film about this era in Mississippi and its aftermath is Rob Reiner's "Ghosts of Mississippi". [NR]

Moby Dick    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Modern Times    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Modesta    (1956) No MPAA Rating; Director: Benjamin Doniger.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Moll Flanders    (1996) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for violence, nudity and sex related material; Director: Pen Densham.     This is a film about a brothel with some graphic sexual activity shown, plenty of profanity, and little, if any, curriculum related content. [NR] (JAF)

The Molly Maguires    (1970) MPAA Rating: PG for violence, language and some thematic material; Director: Martin Ritt.    See the section on this movie in Past Imperfect.

Mom At Sixteen    (2005) No MPAA Rating; Director: Peter Werner.     Recommended by a teacher. We haven't seen it yet.

Mom and Dad    (1945) No MPAA Rating; Director: William Beaudine.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Mommie Dearest    (1981) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Frank Perry.    See the section on this movie in Reel v. Real: How Hollywood Turns Fact Into Fiction and The Motion Picture Prescription.

Monkey Business    (1931) No MPAA Rating; Director: Norman Z. McLeod.    This film is ranked #73 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006).

Monsieur Lazhar    (2011) MPAA Rating: PG-13; Director: Philippe Falardeau.    This is a delightful and sensitive film about a middle school class in Montreal which is rocked when the teacher commits suicide. An improbable substitute, a 53 year-old immigrant from Algeria, steps in to teach the class and assists the children in dealing with their loss. We are not sure but we think this film is more for adults than for students. If anyone disagrees, we'd love to hear about it.

Monsoon Wedding    (2001) MPAA Rating: R for language, including some sex related dialogue; Director: Mira Nair.    "This film introduces modern middle class India and has an interesting subplot about child abuse." [LI] (JAF & DEF)

Monte Walsh    (1970) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: William A. Fraker.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Moonstruck    (1987) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Norman Jewison.    This film is ranked #41 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006). It is a warm and enchanting adult themed comedy about members of an Italian family coming together despite their infidelities. In this movie, the moon has a magic which helps the imperfect characters amicably resolve the problems caused by their faithlessness. The film features arias from Puccini's La Bohéme and an important scene takes place at a Metropolitan Opera performance of that opera. However, there are no important life lessons and there is no real learning potential in this film. It's just warm, loving and funny. [LI] (2010, JAF & DEF)

The Morning After    (1986) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Richard Heffron.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Morocco    (1930) MPAA Rating: Passed; Director: Josef von Sternberg.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Moscow on the Hudson    (1984); MPAA Rating: R; Director: Paul Mazursky.    This is a warm and charming film about the experiences of a musician who defects from the Soviet Union. The movie explores how it feels to be a recent immigrant to the U.S. Two scenes of nude women during love making take the film beyond the parental consensus. [PD] (JAF)

Moses    (1975) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Gianfranco De Bosio.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

The Most Dangerous Game    (1932) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Irving Pichel, Ernest B. Schoedsack.    Suggested by a TWM User. Suggested grades: 9-12.

Motion Painting No. 1    (1947) No MPAA Rating; Director: Oskar Fischinger.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Moulin Rouge    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

The Mountain Men    (1980) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Richard Lang.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Mountains of the Moon    (1990) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Bob Rafelson.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

A Movie    (1958) No MPAA Rating; Director: Bruce Conner.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Mr. Baseball    (1992) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for sensuality and language; Director: Fred Schepisi.    Suggested by a TWM User.

Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House    (1948) No MPAA Rating; Director: H.C. Potter.    This film is ranked #72 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is very funny. [ITO] (JAF) 2007

Mr. Deeds Goes to Town    (1936) No MPAA Rating; Director: Frank Capra.     This film is ranked #70 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006). The film is a charming film in most ways, but the hero, who is shown as a male role model, takes a poke at everyone who gets under his skin. This is unrealistic and a bad model for children. See the section on this movie in Reel Justice. [ITO] & [PD] (JAF)

Mr. Deeds    (2002) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for language including sexual references, and some rear nudity; Director: Steven Brill.    This is a lightweight comedy starring Adam Sandler which is loosely derived from "Mr. Deeds Goes To Town." It is all on the surface with some nice moral messages superficially taught. It suffers from the same defect as the movie from which it is derived in that Mr. Deeds believes that the way to settle a conflict is with his fists. There is also a character with a foot fetish who is tolerantly treated, but the movie is so superficial that this is pretty harmless. Parents whose children watch this movie might want to mention that disagreements are not to be resolved with fists and that the message of the movie, that you should treat everyone honestly, is an important and serious message. [ITO] (JAF 2006)

Mr. Destiny    (1990) MPAA Rating: PG-13; Director: James Orr.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Mr. Holland's Opus    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Mr. Jones    (1993) MPAA Rating: R for language; Director: Mike Figgis.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Mrs. Doubtfire    (1993) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for some sexual references; Director: Chris Columbus.    This film is ranked #67 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006).

Mrs. Miniver    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Mrs. Palfrey at the Claremont     (2005) No MPAA Rating; Director: Dan Ireland.    This movie is a charming story of an unlikely friendship between an elderly woman and a young man. It is full of warmth and love. It ends with the death of the elderly woman seen as a natural, if final, stage of life. We saw nothing objectionable in it that would bar showing this movie to a child and there is much wisdom in the film. The age level is 12+. We haven't figured out how to prepare a Guide for it. (JAF & DEF, 2007)

Mr. Smith Goes to Washington    (1939) No MPAA Rating; Director: Frank Capra.    This film is ranked #29 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006). The film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. The movie gives a good description of what happens when a bill is submitted in the Senate but almost every politician is presented as an idiot or corrupt. However, the film has a naive misunderstanding of the legislative and political process. Much better is Steven Spielberg's Lincoln. Mr. Smith Goes to Washington also presents an inaccurate view of President Lincoln as being above politics. See Lincoln in Hollywood, from Griffith to Spielberg by Sean Wilentz in The New Republic, 12/21/12. Because of its unduely negative view of politicians (the majority of whom are well-meaning people who have the public interest at heart) and because of its naivete, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington is unhelpful and, if taken seriously, harmful.

However, other teachers disagree.
    I was appalled to see that you do not have a lesson plan for Mr. Smith goes to Washington because you think all politicians are shown to be corrupt. This is NOT true. The President pro tempore of the Senate is honest. Clarissa reminds Mr. Smith that not only did Abraham Lincoln struggle with corrupt politicians (Lincoln, the hero of the film, is, of course, a politician), but also that not everyone in Washington is corrupt. Listen to her speech again, please. At the end of Mr. Smith's filibuster, the good members are really caring for him - and the Silver Knight sees the error of his ways. The moral of the film is not, Washington is hopeless, but that political machines can be broken. Students today are expected to know what political machines are on standardized tests. To pretend that they have not, and do not exist, is a disservice to the students. (Who, after all, watch the news and will come this fall with many questions about the Senate rules as they affect the health care bill.)

    I note that you have lesson plans for films with sex and violence, how can you not have one for this great film? Rather than making the students cynical, my experience has been that the film makes them less so. I show it for senior government classes, though; I agree that it is too slow and too deep for students before high school. Thank you. Andrea Maxeiner, Ph.D. Hicksville High School Hicksville, New York from an email August 30, 2009

Dr. Maxeiner raises interesting points but overall TWM believes that the negatives of Mr. Smith Goes to Washington outweigh the positives and that Lincoln should be shown to students instead. [NR] (JAF) Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle (also Mrs. Parker and the Round Table)    (1994) MPAA Rating: R for sexuality and language; Director: Alan Rudolph.     This movie is about Dorothy Parker and the Algonquin Round table. It shows adult themes of sex, adultery, alcoholism, despair, and suicide. [PD] (JAF)

Much Ado About Nothing    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Mulan    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Multiple Sidosis    (1970) No MPAA Rating; Director: Sid Laverents.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Munich    (2005) MPAA Rating: R for strong graphic violence, some sexual content, nudity and language; Director: Steven Spielberg.     We have not seen this film and given its rating probably would not recommend it for adults to show to children. Note the following discussion of the movie in The Searchers: How the West Was Begun by A.O. Scott - New York Times, June 11, 2006: "In 'Munich' the Mossad assassins spend most of the film in a limbo that Ethan Edwards ["The Searchers"] would recognize, even though it takes place amid the man-made monuments of Europe rather than the wind-hewn rock formations of Monument Valley. The Israeli agents are far from home, exiled from the democratic, law-governed society in whose name they commit their acts of vengeance and pre-emption, and frighteningly close both to their enemies and to a state of pure, violent retaliatory anarchy. With more anguish, perhaps, than characters in a John Ford movie, they often find themselves arguing with one another, trying to overcome, or at least to rationalize, the contradictions of what they are doing. They appeal to various texts and traditions, but they might do better to pay attention to the television that is on in the background at one point in the movie: another frame within the frame, tuned, hardly by accident, to 'The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance.'"

Murder by Decree    (1979) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Bob Clark.    Some historians contend that this film, about Jack the Ripper and his terrorization of London in the late 1800s is not historically accurate. See, Past Imperfect.

Murder in the First    (1994) MPAA Rating: R for strong images of prison brutalities, sexuality and language; Director: Marc Rocco.    Not an accurate portrayal. See the section on this movie in Reel Justice. For films that we recommend relating to the U.S. legal system, see the Subject Matter Index under United States/The Law

The Music Box    (1932) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: James Parrott.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Music Box    (1989) MPAA Rating: PG-13; Director: Costa-Gavras.    See the section on this movie in Reel Justice

The Music & Heroes of America    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

The Music Man    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Music of the Heart    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Music Within    (2007) MPAA Rating: R for language including sexual references, and some drug content; Director: Steven Sawalich.    This movie is based on the life story of Richard Pimental, the Vietnam vet who was one of the moving forces behind the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990. This law changed the lives of handicapped Americans and the attitudes of the American people towards people with disabilities. This is an entertaining biopic which highlights the friendship between Pimental, whose war injury left him deaf, and his bright and irreverent friend Art, a man confined to a wheel chair with cerebral palsy. Today's students (and teachers) will be amazed at the hostility, humiliation and almost total lack of opportunity that disabled people had to face as recently as the 1980s. Art's frank and hilarious take on his condition and the way that mainstream society reacts to it, is a wonderful counterweight to the seriousness of the story. In real life, Pimental and Art are still friends! This movie shows veterans smoking marijuana and abusing alcohol but Pimental outgrows it as he begins to find his life's purpose. There is a substantial debate within TWM as to whether we should do a Guide to this movie, despite the showing of drug use and the R rating. The first step is to evaluate the accuracy of the film.     [LI] (JAF & DEF, 2008)



Mutiny on the Bounty    (1935) No MPAA Rating; Director: Frank Lloyd.    This film is ranked #86 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006). Some historians contend that this film is not historically accurate because it telescopes into one evil figure examples of abuse of power by many captains in the Royal Navy of the time, see Past Imperfect. See also the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Mutiny on the Bounty    (1962) No MPAA Rating; Director: Lewis Milestone.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies and Past Imperfect.

My Beautiful Laundrette    (1985) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Stephen Frears.     This is a movie about South Asian immigrants to the U.K. It is part of an emerging genre of films about South Asians who have immigrated to the West. We haven't seen this film. (For an example of this genre on TeachWithMovies.com, see "Bend It Like Beckham".)

My Best Friend's Wedding    (1997) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for one use of strong language and brief sex related humor; Director: P.J. Hogan.    Absolutely hilarious but no curriculum related content. [ITO] (JAF & DEF)

My Big Fat Greek Wedding    (2002) MPAA Rating: PG for sensuality and language; Director: Joel Zwick.    This comedy is about young people who break loose from tradition. We have not seen this movie. This movie has spawned many other movies that include ethnic weddings. See, for example, "Bend It Like Beckham". [LI]

My Bodyguard     (1980) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Tony Bill     This film was recommended for eighth grade by an English teacher for whom we have great respect. He states, and his students confirm, that they love the movie. He uses the film to teach several important elements of fiction. However, the conflict is resolved through fighting. The protagonist is urged to try to break the nose of his bully/bad guy opponent, and he does just that. The bodyguard and the champion of the bad guys are mature enough to be men. They go at each other in a way that would lead to serious injury in real life but in the fantasy world of movies it does not. This film violates TWM's policy that movies which condone violence in personal relations should not be shown by adults to children. NR (JAF, 2009)

My Breast    (1994) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Betty Thomas.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

My Cousin Vinny    (1992) MPAA Rating: R for language; Director: Jonathan Lynn.    See the section on this movie in Reel Justice.

My Darling Clementine    (1946) No MPAA Rating; Director: John Ford.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. See the section on this movie in Past Imperfect.

My Fair Lady    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

My Fellow Americans    (1996) MPAA Rating: PG -13 for salty language and innuendo; Director: Peter Segal.    This film is a light comedic treatment of politics with an upbeat theme. It is an entertaining film for adults to watch. However, it treats adultery as a joke and has a moderate amount of profanity. [LI] (JAF)

My Man Godfrey    (1936) No MPAA Rating; Director: Gregory La Cava.    This film is ranked #44 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. This film gives a view of the Great Depression. [LI] (JAF)

My Name is Bill W.    (1989) No MPAA Rating; Director: Daniel Petrie.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

My Son the Fanatic    (1997) MPAA Rating: R for sexuality, language and a scene of drug use; Director: Udayan Prasad.     This is a movie about South Asian immigrants to the West. It has been Suggested by a TWM User. It is part of an emerging genre of films about South Asians who have immigrated to the West. We haven't seen this film. (For an example of this genre on TeachWithMovies.com, see "Bend It Like Beckham".)



A,    B,   C,   D,   E,   F,   G,   H,    I,    J,   KLN,   O,   P,   Q,   R,   S,   T,   U,   VW,   XY,   Z   




Spread the GOOD NEWS about ...
                                                       TEACHWITHMOVIES.COM!

Click here to recommend this site to a friend!