Notes on Movies for Which a Learning Guide has Not
Been Written -- Titles Starting with the Letter "N"


A,   B,   C,   D,   E,   F,   G,   H,    I,    J,   KLM,  
O,   P,   Q,   R,   S,   T,   U,   VW,   XY,   Z   

For the meanings of the initials in brackets at the end of many of the entries, click here.



Nacho Libre    (2006) MPAA Rating: PG for some rough action, and crude humor including dialogue; Director: Jared Hess.    We could not find sufficient educational content to justify this film. The humor escaped us. [ITO] (JAF 2006)

The Naked City    (1948) No MPAA Rating; Director: Jules Dassin.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Naked Lunch    (1991) MPAA Rating: R for heavy drug content, bizarre eroticism, and language; Director: David Cronenberg.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

The Naked Spur    (1953) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: Anthony Mann.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Namesake    (2006) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for sexuality/nudity, a scene of drug use, some disturbing images and brief language; Director: Mira Nair.     This movie explores what it's like to grow up in the U.S. with parents who were raised in India. The film is worthwhile for children of Indian/American heritage. However, we don't think the film's appeal is universal enough for children of other ethnic origins to sit through it. The movie is quite long. [PD] (JAF & DEF, 2007)

The Nanny Diaries    (2007) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for language; Director: Shari Springer Berman and Robert Pulcini.    A college graduate, at loose ends, decides to work as a nanny and treat her experience as an anthropological study of rich, over privileged, New York City canyon dwellers. The movie is quite entertaining and has excellent moments. We haven't figured out a way to make it into a teaching tool. [LI] (JAF & DEF, 2007)

Nanook of the North    (1922) No MPAA Rating; Director: Robert J. Flaherty.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Napoleon    (1927) No MPAA Rating; Director: Abel Gance.     This is a silent film reissued in modern times by Francis Ford Coppola. It is inaccessible for a young audience. Try "Conquest". [NA] (JAF)

Nashville    (1975) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Robert Altman.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. The story line is obtuse and contains adult themes relating to sex. [NR] (JAF)

National Lampoon's Animal House    (1978) MPAA Rating: R; Director: John Landis.    This film is ranked #36 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

National Treasure    (2004) MPAA Rating: PG for action violence and some scary images; Director: Jon Turteltaub.    "National Treasure is a great movie. I use it to teach the importance of background music in film. I am not a history teacher, therefore I cannot say how accurate the historical aspects of the movie are. If they are accurate, then this film would be great for history teachers as well." Donna Jones, music teacher; Cosby, TN. Suggested grades: 9-12.

National Velvet    (1944) MPAA Rating: G; Director: Clarence Brown.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Native Americans    (1994) No MPAA Rating; Director: John Borden, George Burdeau.    Suggested by a TWM User.

Native Son    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

The Natural    (1984) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Barry Levinson.    Suggested by a TWM User. This movie is beautifully made and we would recommend it for adults. It has adult themes that are not educational for children. There are better baseball movies for kids. See TWM's Index to Movies Relating to Sports and Games. [PD] (JAF)

Naughty Marietta    (1935) MPAA Rating: Approved; Directors: Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

The Navigator    (1924) No MPAA Rating; Directors: Donald Crisp, Buster Keaton.    This film is ranked #81 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006).

Network    (1976) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Sidney Lumet.    This film is ranked #66 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Never Cry Wolf    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Newsies    (1992) MPAA Rating: PG for mild violence; Director: Kenny Ortega.    "It is an awesome film for kids. Great subject, great characters, and great songs!" Elise Longoria, Teacher, Casselberry, FL. Suggested grades: 4-12.

Isaac Newton: A Tale Of Two Isaacs    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Nicholas and Alexandra    (1972) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Franklin J. Schaffner.    See the sections on this movie in Reel v. Real: How Hollywood Turns Fact Into Fiction and in History Goes to the Movies.

Night and Fog    (1955) No MPAA Rating; Director: Alain Resnais.    See the entry for this film in Reading in the Reel World: Teaching Documentaries and Other Nonfiction Texts by John Golden, National Council of Teachers of English, 2006. (JAF & DEF)

A Night at the Opera    (1935) No MPAA Rating; Directors: Sam Wood, Edmund Goulding.     This film is ranked #12 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

'Night Mother    (1986) MPAA Rating: PG-13; Director: Tom Moore.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Night of the Hunter    (1955) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: Charles Laughton.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Night of the Living Dead    (1968) No MPAA Rating; Director: George A. Romero.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

A Night To Remember    (1958) No MPAA Rating; Director: Roy Baker.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

Night Train to Munich    (1940) No MPAA Rating; Director: Carol Reed.    This is a charming spy thriller that introduces two classic and hilarious English characters who pop up in other films. Not historically accurate or realistic. [ITO] (JAF)

Night Watch    (2004) MPAA Rating: R for strong violence, disturbing images and language; Director: Timur Bekmambetov.    Recommended by Asia, a teacher from Russia. [LI]

Nine to Five    (1980) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Colin Higgins.     The ladies smoke pot and it has adult sexual themes. It is a funny movie. [ITO] (JAF)

Ninotchka    (1939) No MPAA Rating; Director: Ernst Lubitsch.    This film is ranked #52 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Nixon    (1995) MPAA Rating: R for language; Director: Oliver Stone.     The "history" in this is too controversial. Try "All the President's Men". Also, see the sections on this movie in Reel v. Real: How Hollywood Turns Fact Into Fiction, Past Imperfect and History Goes to the Movies.

No Way Out    (1987) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Roger Donaldson.     This spy thriller contains unnecessary violence with not a whole lot of teaching opportunities. [ITO] (JAF)

Norma Rae    (1979) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Martin Ritt.    Two scenes disqualify this movie which is an otherwise good film about labor organizing. First there is the scene with the lover in which he speaks of her three orgasms, uses other profane terms, and then hits her. Then there is the description of the union organizer's first sexual experience. However, while a few facts have been changed to improve the dramatic effect of the story, the film has been recommended by historians as a truthful description of life inside a textile plant, efforts to unionize the textile industry, and the story of a strong, courageous woman. Crystal Lee, the real life Norma Rae, called the film, "as true to life as a movie can be." See the article on this film in History by Hollywood: The Use and Abuse of the American Past. If you can find a way to turn down the sound during the objectionable dialog it would be an excellent teaching film. [PD] (JAF & DEF)

North By Northwest    (1959) No MPAA Rating; Director: Alfred Hitchcock.    This film is ranked #40 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. A teacher who is an expert at using film in the classroom has developed a way to use scenes from this movie for certain activities. See Reading in the Dark, by John Golden, 2001, National Council of Teachers of English.

El Norte    (1983) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Gregory Nava.    "Movies like this are an urgent need in our diversity classes." Tina, Teacher, Tulsa, OK. Suggested grades: age 18 and up.

The North Star    (1943) No MPAA Rating; Director: Lewis Milestone.    This is U.S. WW II propaganda about a Ukrainian village repulsing an attack by the Germans. Repackaged years later under the name "Armored Attack" the film is unrealistic and historically inaccurate. For a classic film about the Russian Front in WW II, see "Ballad of a Soldier". [NR] (JAF)

North Dallas 40    (1979) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Ted Kotcheff.     This film is about lots of drugs, a good amount of sex, team politics and the abuse of players in professional football. We recommend the film for adults but not for children. For a film about professional football see "Brian's Song". [NR] (JAF)

Nostalgia (also known as Hapax Legomena I: Nostalgia)    (1971) No MPAA Rating; Director: Hollis Frampton.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Not My Kid    (1985) No MPAA Rating; Director: Michael Tuckner.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

Nothing But a Man    (1964) No MPAA Rating; Director: Michael Roemer.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

Nothing but the Truth    (2008) MPAA Rating: R for language, some sexual material and a scene of violence; Director: Rod Lurie     This movie was inspired by the story of New York Times reporter Judith Miller who went to jail for 12 weeks for contempt of court to protect Lewis "Scooter" Libby, Vice President Dick Cheney's chief of staff, from exposure as a person who deliberately leaked the name of a covert CIA agent to the press. The CIA agent was Valerie Plame and the purpose of the leak was to punish Ms. Plame's husband, Joe Wilson for disputing the inaccurate position of the George W. Bush administration that Iraq was acquiring uranium in Africa. The purpose of protecting a source is to make sure that sources are not punished by persons and institutions with power, primarily government officials and the government, for giving information to a reporter. However, in this case, the source was one of the highest officials in the government and the information was: (1) provided for the purpose of punishing an opponent of the government and (2) the report was used by the government to punish someone, rather than being an effort to expose government corruption or provide information on a government policy. The movie skirts this question and, in fact, turns reality on its head by having the "source" be someone innocent and vulnerable who was not a member of the government. This movie is not inspired by a real story, but to the extent that it asks to be taken seriously, it betrays the real story.

There are arguments for and against a reporter's privilege to keep a source confidential. This movie is not a coherent or intelligent discussion of those arguments.

The question we kept asking ourselves throughout this whole affair as it unfolded in reality and while watching the movie, was how could the reporters allow themselves to be the accessories to a crime, i.e., exposing the identity of a covert CIA operative. This was not like the Pentagon Papers case in which there was a benefit to the country in revealing classified information. There was no benefit to the U.S. in outing Valerie Plame. To their lasting shame Judith Miller and Robert Novak stand as reporters who allowed themselves to be used by the government to assist the government in violating the law by actions that were, when all is said and done, disloyal to the country. We heard that there were several other reporters who had the story but who refused to write it up, to avoid being a tool of the government and assisting in the commission of a crime. We hope that was a true report.

Finally, in addition to failing to deal with the real issues of a reporter's obligation to protect a source, this movie is rife with historical inaccuracy. [NR] (JAF, 2009)

Notorious    (1946) No MPAA Rating; Director: Alfred Hitchcock.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. A teacher who is an expert at using film in the classroom has developed a way to use scenes from this movie for certain activities. See Reading in the Dark, by John Golden, 2001, National Council of Teachers of English. We have not reviewed this movie.

Now, Voyager    (1942) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: Irving Rapper.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

La Nuit de Varennes    (1982) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Ettore Scola (in French with English subtitles).    This is a fascinating film about the attempt of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette to flee France in 1789. The film concentrates on a stage coach ride paralleling the King's route. On the coach are: a countess who is following the King and fully aware of his intentions; Casanova, then 66 years of age, who is going to a German court; a writer who suspects what is happening with the King; and Thomas Paine, the author of Common Sense. The relationships that develop during the ride are fascinating. We have not checked the accuracy of this film, although we assume that the stage coach ride and the convergence of characters are fictional. The problem with the film is that it shows nudity and a man fondling the breast of what appears to be his grown daughter. Otherwise the film is delightful but the few sexual scenes place it beyond the parental consensus. [PD] (JAF)

The Nutcracker    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

Nuts    (1987) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Martin Ritt.    See the sections on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription and Reel Justice.

The Nutty Professor    (1963) No MPAA Rating; Director: Jerry Lewis.    This film is ranked #99 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.



A,    B,   C,   D,   E,   F,   G,   H,    I,    J,   KLM,  
O,   P,   Q,   R,   S,   T,   U,   VW,   XY,   Z   




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