ROOTS VOLUME III

SUBJECTS — U.S./1750 – 1812 & Diversity;

SOCIAL-EMOTIONAL LEARNING — Surviving;

MORAL-ETHICAL EMPHASIS — Respect.

AGE: 12+; Not Rated;

Drama; 1977; 90 minutes; Color. Available from Amazon.com.

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MOVIE WORKSHEETS & STUDENT HANDOUTS

TWM offers the following movie worksheets to keep students’ minds on the film and to focus their attention on the lessons to be learned from the movie.

 

Film Study Worksheet for a Work of Historical Fiction;

Film Study Worksheet for ELA Classes; and

Worksheet for Cinematic and Theatrical Elements and Their Effects.

 

Teachers can modify the movie worksheets to fit the needs of each class. See also TWM’s Historical Fiction in Film Cross-Curricular Homework Project and Movies as Literature Homework Project.

 

Additional ideas for lesson plans for this movie can be found at TWM’s guide to Lesson Plans Using Film Adaptations of Novels, Short Stories or Plays.

DESCRIPTION

Roots is a video presentation of Alex Haley’s Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Roots: The Saga of an American Family. Volume III shows the end of Kunta Kinte’s dream of escaping to freedom.

SELECTED AWARDS & CAST

Selected Awards:

The “Roots” series won a Golden Globe Award as the Best Television Series of 1978, nine Emmy Awards, and many other honors.

 

Featured Actors:

John Amos, Lynda Day George, Louis Gossett, Jr. Loren Greene, Vic Maro, Robert Reed, Madge Sinclair.

 

Director:

Marvin J. Chompsky.

BENEFITS OF THE MOVIE

The series describes important aspects of the black experience in the U.S. and, for all Americans, helps in facing the legacies of slavery and segregation.

POSSIBLE PROBLEMS

MINOR. There is some violence but it is appropriate to the film’s message.

PARENTING POINTS

Review the description of the “bargain with the devil” on slavery that was necessary to get the Southern states to join the American Revolution and to adopt the U.S. Constitution. See Learning Guide to “Roots, Volume I“. Describe this information to your child. Ask and help your child to answer the Quick Discussion Question and the Question on Morality and Ethics.

HELPFUL BACKGROUND

See the TWM student handout Slavery: A World-Wide View, Then and Now.

For a description of the “bargain with the devil” on slavery that was necessary to get the Southern states to join the American Revolution and to adopt the U.S. Constitution, see Learning Guide to “Roots, Volume I“.

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

SOCIAL-EMOTIONAL LEARNING

SURVIVING

1. Did Kunta Kinte do the right thing by having a child with Bell and giving up his dream of running away to freedom?

MORAL-ETHICAL EMPHASIS (CHARACTER COUNTS)

Discussion Questions Relating to Ethical Issues will facilitate the use of this film to teach ethical principles and critical viewing. Additional questions are set out below.

 

RESPECT

(Treat others with respect; follow the Golden Rule; Be tolerant of differences; Use good manners, not bad language; Be considerate of the feelings of others; Don’t threaten, hit or hurt anyone; Deal peacefully with anger, insults and disagreements)

 

1. Is it possible for a slave owner to act respectfully toward his or her slave?

Suggested Response:

No. The very nature of the slave/master relationship is for the owner to take advantage of the slave. The slave serves the owner without recompense. A good employer/employee relationship is much different. The employer pays for the work of the employee at a reasonable rate. An employer can also train an employee so that he can undertake new responsibilities, have a more satisfying job and make more money.

ASSIGNMENTS, PROJECTS & ACTIVITIES

BRIDGES TO READING

Older children who are good readers will enjoy the book Roots: The Saga of an American Family by Alex Haley. Books recommended for middles school and junior high readers include: To Be A Slave by Julius Lester, illustrated by Tom Feelings.

This Learning Guide was last updated on July 21, 2011.