Notes on Movies for Which a Learning Guide has Not
Been Written -- Titles Starting with the Letter "L"


A,   B,   C,   D,   E,   F,   G,   H,    I,    J,   KM,  
N,   O,   P,   Q,   R,   S,   T,   U,   VW,   XY,   Z   

For the meanings of the initials in brackets at the end of many of the entries, click here.



    L.A. Story    (1991); MPAA Rating: PG 13; Director: Mick Jackson.     This hilarious and affectionate spoof of trendy L.A. life in the 1980s is one of our favorites but it lacks substance if you don't live in L.A., has some sex and nudity, and deals with some adult themes. [ITO] (JAF & DEF)

    La Bamba    (1987) MPAA Rating: PG-13; Director: Luis Valdez.     This film contains scenes of gratuitous violence, nudity, sex, domestic abuse, and drug dealing. There is some interesting history here, but too many negatives for use as a teaching tool. [ITO] (JAF & DEF)

    La Habitación de Fermat (Fermat's Room)     (2007) No MPAA Rating; Directors: Luis Piedrahita and Rodrigo Sopeña     This movie is a murder mystery in which four mathmatics geniuses are lured to a room in which they will meet their deaths unless they can quickly figure out the riddles sent to them by text messages. It is a great film and we could see it being shown in mathmatics classes for a reward or in Spanish language classes for pronunciation, practice and cultural background. There is no graphic violence and no sex. There is a reference to the female character having become addicted to parties in which she becomes hooked on unspeakable acts which we assume are sexual but which are not otherwise described. LI (JAF, 2009)

    La Traviata    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

    The Lady Eve    (1941) No MPAA Rating; Director: Preston Sturges.    This film is ranked #55 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006). This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

    Lady Helen's Escapade    (1909) No MPAA Rating; Director: D.W. Griffith.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

    Lady Jane    (1985) MPAA Rating: PG-13; Director: Trevor Nunn.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

    Lady Sings the Blues    (1972) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Sidney J. Furie.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

    Lady Windermere's Fan    (1925) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: Ernst Lubitsch.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

    Lambchops    (1929) No MPAA Rating; Director: Unlisted.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

    Land and Freedom    (1995) No MPAA Rating; Director: Kenneth Loach.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

    The Land Beyond the Sunset    (1912) No MPAA Rating; Director: Dorothy G. Shore.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

    The Land Girls    (1998) MPAA Rating: R for some sexuality; Director: David Leland.     We could find no curriculum related content in this movie. [ITO]

    Land of the Pharaohs    (1955) No MPAA Rating; Director: Howard Hawks.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

    L'Argent    (1983) No MPAA Rating; Director: Robert Bresson.     This movie is too sparse and obtuse to be interesting to students (or adults for that matter). [NR] (JAF & DEF, 2008)

    Lassie Come Home    (1943) MPAA Rating: G; Director: Fred M. Wilcox.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

    The Last Command    (1955) No MPAA Rating; Director: Frank Lloyd.    This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film. See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

    The Last Day    (1975) No MPAA Rating; Director: Vincent McEveety.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

    The Last Days of Patton    (1986) No MPAA Rating; Director: Delbert Mann.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies. Try Patton.

    The Last Emperor    (1987) PG-13; Director: Bernardo Bertolucci.    While the film is interesting and introduces us to an historical period most know little about, it contains gratuitous violence. There is a scene toward the end in which we see someone's brains blown out of his head by a gun in slow motion. The director must have thought it was "artistic." But see comments by a teacher who edits this film and uses it along with The Good Earth. Also see the sections on this movie in Reel v. Real: How Hollywood Turns Fact Into Fiction and History Goes to the Movies. [NR] (JAF & DEF)

    The Last of the Mohicans    (1920) No MPAA Rating; Directors: Clarence Brown and Maurice Tourneur.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

    The Last of the Mohicans    (1992) MPAA Rating: R for violence; Director: Michael Mann.    Some historians contend that this film is not historically accurate. See, Past Imperfect. But note the following comment from a teacher:
    Great film to use with the theme of Indian Wars or early North American History... it is not terribly accurate, however I am using it in two high school classes of English Language Learner U.S. History. The reason I decided to use it is because it presents two themes well: the early struggles of colonials (it's emphasized that these people were former indentured servants who only got a toehold because of land grants) and their dawning awareness that being ruled by the British was going to get harder, not easier. Second theme is race. The movie makes clear the disdain, hatred and fear that ALL Europeans had for the Indians. The film also does a credible job of presenting Indian cultures and the Indian's own conflicts, tribe to tribe. This prevented them from uniting against all those who were stealing their land wholesale and slaughtering at will. These are the big themes I wanted the kids to understand. For teenagers struggling with English and no knowledge of American history the film serves a good purpose. Also, the detail with costumes, warfare and tools of war are accurate. And last, but not least, the Indians are presented in a sympathetic way with many Indians in the cast, speaking native languages. I wish there were more and better films out there but this one is working for the purposes mentioned above. Hope this helps.
    Katherine Schwartz, Teacher, Chicago, IL. Suggested grades: 9-12. See the sections on this movie in History Goes to the Movies and Past Imperfect.

    The Last Samurai   (2003) MPAA Rating: R for strong violence and battle sequences; Director: Edward Zwick.     This movie is characterized by gratuitous violence and a story that romanticizes war and violence. [NR] (JAF, 2008)

    Las Vegas Vacation    (1997) MPAA Rating: PG for sensuality, language and thematic elements; Director: Stephen Kessler.    This is really an advertisement for the Las Vegas entertainment industry and, while it shows the dangers of uncontrolled gambling, the resolution is ridiculous and senseless. [ITO]

    The Last Temptation Of Christ    (1988) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Martin Scorsese.    See the section on this movie in Reel v. Real: How Hollywood Turns Fact Into Fiction.

    The Last Waltz    (1978) No MPAA Rating; Director: Martin Scorcese.    "This film is great for music classes." Elaine Little, Teacher, Calhoun, GA. Suggested grades: 9-12.

    Laura    (1944) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: Otto Preminger.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

    The Lawless Breed    (1952) No MPAA Rating; Director: Raoul Walsh.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

    Lawman    (1971) MPAA Rating: R for violent content; Director: Michael Winner.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

    Lawrence Of Arabia    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

    Lean On Me    (1989) MPAA Rating: PG-13; Director: John G. Avildsen.    Suggested by several people.

    The Learning Tree    (1969) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Gordon Parks.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

    The Left-Handed Gun    (1958) No MPAA Rating; Director: Arthur Penn.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

    Legal Eagles    (1986) MPAA Rating: PG; Ivan Reitman.     Funny and entertaining, but an unrealistic view of the legal process. For films that we recommend relating to the U.S. legal system, see the Subject Matter Index under United States/The Law [NR]

    Leonardo: A Dream Of Flight    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

    Les Misérables    A Learning Guide has been prepared for the 1978 and 1998 versions of this movie.

    Les Misérables    (1995) MPAA Rating: R for violence, brief language and sexuality; Director: Claude Lelouch (in French with English subtitles).    This is a beautiful epic with, in Roger Ebert's words, "one of the most intriguing uses of literature I have seen in the movies." The film does not retell the story of the book but weaves episodes from the book into sequences from the late 19th Century through the end of World War II. A large portion of the movie is devoted to the experiences of a Jewish family persecuted by the Nazis. This is certainly a film worth seeing as an adult and perhaps could be used as a teaching tool but we are not sure. The film shows that some Frenchmen collaborated with the Nazis and others resisted. Our main problem with this movie is that the Jewish family survived intact. It is true that some Jewish children were saved by being placed under Christian names in convent schools or with gentile families. It is also true that some Jews and other persons hunted by the Nazis were hidden by sympathetic people in the occupied territories. It is true that some people survived the concentration camps. We have heard of a few husband and wife couples who survived the camps and were reunited after the war. However, the Nazi extermination of Jews, political opponents, gypsies, the religious etc., was a ruthlessly efficient machine that murdered the vast majority of people it pursued. The twelve million who were murdered simply had no chance. This film does not deal with that issue and as such does not accurately portray the Holocaust. The movie also graphically shows three suicides. The 1978 made for TV version of Les Miserables is excellent and a better teaching tool. The 1998 film version is also good. See Les Misérables.

    Less Than Zero    (1987) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Mark Kanievska.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

    Let Him Have It    (1991) MPAA Rating: R for language and violence; Director: Peter Medak.    See the section on this movie in Reel Justice.

    Let's All Go to the Lobby    (1957) No MPAA Rating; Director: Unlisted.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

    The Letter    (1940) No MPAA Rating; Director: William Wyler.    See the section on this movie in Reel Justice.

    Letter from an Unknown Woman    (1948) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: Max Ophüls.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

    Letters to Juliet    (2010) MPAA Rating: PG for brief rude behavior, some language and incidental smoking ; Director: Gary Winick.   This is a very nice romantic comedy with hardly anything to do with Shakespeare's Juliet. It has no significant educational content that we could find.

    Libel    (1959) No MPAA Rating; Director: Anthony Asquith.    See the section on this movie in Reel Justice.

    The Life and Death of 9413, a Hollywood Extra    (1928) No MPAA Rating; Directors: Robert Florey and Slavko Vorkapich.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

    The Life and Times of Rosie the Riveter    (1980) No MPAA Rating; Director: Connie Field.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

    Life is Beautiful    (1997) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for holocaust-related thematic elements; Director: Roberto Benigni.    Suggested by a TWM User. A teacher who is an expert at using film in the classroom has developed a way to use scenes from this movie for certain activities. See Reading in the Dark, by John Golden, 2001, National Council of Teachers of English. Our hesitation with this film is that it denies the horror of the concentration camps. We can't believe anyone could successfully shelter a child in a concentration camp as portrayed in this film. [LI]

    The Life Of Emile Zola    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

    Life of the Party: The Story of Beatrice    (1982) No MPAA Rating; Director: Lamont Johnson.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

    Life With Father    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

    The Lighthorsemen    (1987) No MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Simon Wincer.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

    Lili    (1953) No MPAA Rating; Director: Charles Walters.     This is a sweet musical about a girl involved with a carnival in Europe. She falls in love with the wrong guy and thereby hangs the tale. There is no content related to the usual curriculum. [NR]

    The Lives of Others    (2006) MPAA Rating: R for some sexuality/nudity; Director: Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck.    This outstanding film is about the East German secret police (the Stasi) and the effects of a totalitarian regime on artists. It is an accurate depiction of life in East Germany in 1984 in the sense that good fiction is accurate. The acting, directing, everything is superior. It won an Academy Award in 2007 for best foreign film beating out such great films as Water. This is a film that should be seen especially in the modern-day U.S., which has increased its domestic surveillance in response to the threat from radical, misguided Islam. The director's voice-over and his interview in the special features are also excellent. The R rating is for a brief and sensitive love scene.

    This is an excellent film for giving students a view of what life was like in the GDR (Communist East Germany). It is authentic and truthful. Note that For Love or Country is probably a better film for demonstrating the difficulties of the life of an artist in a totalitarian country. For Love or Country is closer to home, dealing with Cuba and the defection of the great jazz trumpet player Arturo Sandoval to the United States. It shows the angst of the artist hamstrung by a totalitarian regime better than "The Lives of Others". For Love or Country is also an excellent introduction to Jazz and the historical figures of Sandoval and Dizzy Gillespie. Finally, it is rated PG-13 while The Lives of Others is rated R. However, classes studying the Soviet empire, the GDR or the psychology of secret police agencies will benefit greatly from The Lives of Others. [PD and LI] (JAF & DEF 2007)

    Lion in Winter    (1968) MPAA Rating: PG; Director: Anthony Harvey.    Suggested by several people. See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

    The Lion King    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

    Liszt's Rhapsody    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

    Little Buddha    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

    Little Caesar    (1931) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: Mervyn LeRoy.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

    The Little Fugitive    (1953) No MPAA Rating; Directors: Ray Ashley and Morris Engel.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

    Little Giants    (1994) MPAA Rating: PG for kids' rude language and pranks; Director: Duwayne Dunham.    The movie is entertaining for children but we would find no content suitable for teaching purposes. Try "Angels in the Outfield". (JAF)

    Little Miss Marker    (1934) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: Alexander Hall.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

    Little Shop of Horrors    (1986) MPAA Rating: PG-13; Director: Frank Oz.    This film is delightful in many ways but it has lots of needless profanity and little content useful for teaching. (JAF)

    Little Women    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

    The Living Desert    (1953) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: James Algar.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

    The Loneliest Runner    (1976) No MPAA Rating; Director: Michael Landon.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

    Lonesome Dove    (1989) No MPAA Rating; Director: Simon Windsor.    This Western contains adult themes and adult presentation with little or no educational value that we could find. Try "The Ox Bow Incident". (JAF)

    The Long Riders    (1980) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Walter Hill.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

    The Long Walk Home    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

    A Long Way Home    (1981) No MPAA Rating; Director: Robert Markowitz.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

    The Longest Day    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

    Looking For Richard    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

    The Lords of Flatbush    (1974) MPAA Rating: PG; Directors: Martin Davidson and Stephen Verona, Screenplay by: Sylvester Stallone.    Mr. Stallone reportedly received $500,000 from a tobacco company in return for his agreement to use tobacco products during five of his movies. We find this conduct to be reprehensible. Before showing any Stallone film to children, disclose Mr. Stallone's shameful conduct and warn them about smoking. [NR]

    Lord of the Flies    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

    Lorenzo's Oil    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.

    Losing Isaiah    (1995) MPAA Rating: R for drug related material and brief strong language; Director: Stephen Gyllenhaal.    See the section on this movie in Reel Justice.

    Lost in America    (1985) MPAA Rating: R; Director: Albert Brooks.    This film is ranked #84 on the American Film Institute's List of the 100 Funniest American Movies of All Time (2006).

    Lost Command    (1966) No MPAA Rating; Director: Mark Robson.    See the section on this movie in History Goes to the Movies.

    The Lost Weekend    (1945) No MPAA Rating; Director: Billy Wilder.    See the section on this movie in The Motion Picture Prescription.

    The Lost World    (1925) No MPAA Rating; Director: Harry O. Hoyt.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

    The Lottery    (1969) No MPAA Rating; Director: Larry Yust.    Suggested by a TWM User. Suggested grades: 9-12.

    Louisiana Story    (1948) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: Robert J. Flaherty.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

    Love Actually    (2003) MPAA: Rated R for sexuality, nudity and language; Director: Richard Curtis.    Most people find this film absolutely hilarious and utterly delightful. It has a huge heart. However, it's definitely not for children in most homes. The movie consists of a series of vignettes about romantic relationships: the girl whose mentally ill brother interferes with her attempts to live a normal life and have relationships with men; the secretary trying to seduce the boss; actors in a porn film who meet as they are going through the moves and fall in love; a man who comes home to find his brother in bed with his wife; a British Prime Minister (a bachelor) who falls in love with one of his former assistants. Then there's the plot about the aging rock star who promises on national TV to perform nude if his song is the #1 Christmas song that year. It is and he does. This is not a teaching film, but it's great entertainment. (JAF & DEF)

    Love Don't Cost a Thing    (2003) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for sexual content/humor; Director: Troy Beyer.    This is an updated version of "Can't Buy Me Love" with a black cast. It's a nice film but the plot and character development are not quite as good as in the original. Teachers report to us that the original works with minority classes. (JAF & DEF, 2007)

    Love Field    (1992) MPAA Rating: PG-13; Director: Jonathan Kaplan.    This movie has extramarital sex and wife beating. It is can be entertaining for adults because the main character's obsession with Jackie Kennedy is a metaphor for how millions of American women felt about the late First Lady. The film explores vicarious lives, the oppression of women, and the possibilities of interracial love. It has too many adult themes for children. (JAF & DEF)

    Love Finds Andy Hardy    (1938) MPAA Rating: Approved; Director: George B. Seitz.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

    Love's Labour's Lost    (2000) MPAA Rating: PG for sensuality and a brief drug reference; Director: Kenneth Branagh.    This film doesn't really work. (JAF)

    Love Me Tonight    (1932) MPAA Rating: Passed; Director: Rouben Mamoulian.     This film is listed in the National Film Registry of the U.S. Library of Congress as a "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" film.

    Lust For Life    A Learning Guide has been prepared for this movie.



    A,    B,   C,   D,   E,   F,   G,   H,    I,    J,   KM,  
    N,   O,   P,   Q,   R,   S,   T,   U,   VW,   XY,   Z   




Spread the GOOD NEWS about ...
                                                       TEACHWITHMOVIES.COM!

Click here to recommend this site to a friend!